The Pirate's Daughter by Margaret Cezair-Thompson

About the book

Jamaica, 1946. Errol Flynn washes up on in the Zaca, his storm-wrecked yacht. Ida Joseph, the teenaged daughter of Port Antonio’s Justice of the Peace, is intrigued to learn that the ‘World’s Handsomest Man’ is on the island, and makes it her business to meet him. For the jaded swashbuckler, Jamaica is a tropical paradise that Ida, unfazed by his celebrity, seems to share. Soon Flynn has made a home for himself on Navy Island, where he entertains the cream of Hollywood at parties that become a byword for decadence – and Ida has set her heart on marrying this charismatic older man who has singled her out for his attention. Flynn and Ida do not marry, but Ida bears Flynn a daughter, May, who will meet her father but once. The Pirate’s Daughter is a tale of passion and recklessness, of two generations of women and their battles for love and survivial, and of a nation struggling to rise to the challenge of hard-won independence.

Reviewed by Mill Hill Book Club:

Most people enjoyed the book. We all felt we learnt a lot about Jamaica and about Errol Flynn. Most felt it was a little slow in places, but picked up and became more interesting towards the end.

Rating: 3 Stars
 

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4 thoughts on “The Pirate's Daughter by Margaret Cezair-Thompson”

  1. Review by Museum Book Group:
    A great read with intriguing twist at the end. A book about relationships set in Jamaica. The glamorous film star setting. Post war settlers. The complicated families of Jamaica just before independence leaves one wanting to find out more.
    Star rating: ****

  2. Review by Museum Book Group:
    A great read with intriguing twist at the end. A book about relationships set in Jamaica. The glamorous film star setting. Post war settlers. The complicated families of Jamaica just before independence leaves one wanting to find out more.
    Star rating: ****

  3. Review by Waterside Phoenix
    This book should be approached with an open mind and a great deal of free reading tiem available. As a picture of the rather pointless life of a fmous film star it adds nothing to the existing popularly circulated legend. The plot, centred on the progress of three self-centered women against a background of a small nation in turmoil, could have been transferred to any monthly magazine. however the writing is excellent with easy use of patois and keen descriptions of place and people. The political involvements in the background revela hoe little the British public knew about West Indian life and may spur some readers to learn more.
    Star rating: 0 stars to **** Split decision by group

  4. Review by Waterside Phoenix
    This book should be approached with an open mind and a great deal of free reading tiem available. As a picture of the rather pointless life of a fmous film star it adds nothing to the existing popularly circulated legend. The plot, centred on the progress of three self-centered women against a background of a small nation in turmoil, could have been transferred to any monthly magazine. however the writing is excellent with easy use of patois and keen descriptions of place and people. The political involvements in the background revela hoe little the British public knew about West Indian life and may spur some readers to learn more.
    Star rating: 0 stars to **** Split decision by group

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