The Great Fire by Shirley Hazzard

About the book

The year is 1947. The great fire of the Second World War has convulsed Europe and Asia. In its wake, Aldred Leith, an acclaimed hero of the conflict, has spent two years in China at work on an account of world-transforming change there. Son of a famed and sexually ruthless novelist, Leith begins to resist his own self-sufficiency, nurtured by war. Peter Exley, another veteran and an art historian by training, is prosecuting war crimes committed by the Japanese. Both men have narrowly escaped death in battle, and Leith saved Exley’s life. The men have maintained long-distance friendship in a postwar loneliness that haunts them both, and which has swallowed Exley whole. Now in their thirties, with their youth behind them and their world in ruins, both must invent the future and retrieve a private humanity. Arriving in Occupied Japan to record the effects of the bomb at Hiroshima, Leith meets Benedict and Helen Driscoll, the Australian son and daughter of a tyrannical medical administrator. Benedict, at twenty, is doomed by a rare degenerative disease. Helen, still younger, is inseparable from her brother. Precocious, brilliant, sensitive, at home in the books they read together, these two have been, in Leith’s words, delivered by literature. The young people capture Leith’s sympathy; indeed, he finds himself struggling with his attraction to this girl whose feelings are as intense as his own and from whom he will soon be fatefully parted.

Reviewed by  Stubbington Book Circle:

The disjointed writing at the beginning captured the uncertain times they were living through.

Star rating: **

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2 thoughts on “The Great Fire by Shirley Hazzard”

  1. Review by Everton Reading Group:
    A disappointment – not really valid as an award winner. Sentence construction got in the way of the story. Rather implausible wandering.
    Star rating: *

  2. Review by Women who Read
    This was quite a slow burner and in some ways was quite disappointing – the focus was on character and we felt there were missed opportunities to explore areas such as Hiroshima and Maoist China.
    Star rating **

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