Happy birthday Stephen Hawking

To celebrate 75 years of one of the most influential scientists of our time, we’ve put together our ultimate Stephen Hawking booklist for you to enjoy! Whether your a physics enthusiast or just browsing for your next read, take a look at our suggestions…

A brief history of time, Stephen Hawking


Was there a beginning of time? Could time run backwards? Is the universe infinite or does it have boundaries? These are just some of the questions considered in an internationally acclaimed masterpiece by one of the world’s greatest thinkers. It begins by reviewing the great theories of the cosmos from Newton to Einstein, before delving into the secrets which still lie at the heart of space and time, from the Big Bang to black holes, via spiral galaxies and strong theory. To this day A Brief History of Time remains a staple of the scientific canon, and its succinct and clear language continues to introduce millions to the universe and its wonders.

A briefer history of time, Stephen Hawking & Leonard Mlodinow



Although this book is literally somewhat ‘briefer’, it actually expands on the great subjects of the original. Purely technical concepts, such as the mathematics of chaotic boundary conditions, are gone. Conversely, subjects of wide interest that were difficult to follow because they were interspersed throughout the book have now been given entire chapters of their own, including relativity, curved space, and quantum theory. This reorganization has allowed the authors to expand areas of special interest and recent progress, from the latest developments in string theory to exciting developments in the search for a complete, unified theory of all the forces of physics.

The universe in a nutshell, Stephen Hawking



in The Universe in a Nutshell, Stephen Hawking brings us fully up-to-date with the advances in scientific thinking. We are now nearer than we have ever been to a full understanding of the universe. In a fascinating and accessible discussion that ranges from quantum mechanics, to time travel, black holes to uncertainty theory, to the search for science’s Holy Grail – the unified field theory (or in layman’s terms the ‘theory of absolutely everything’) Professor Hawking once more takes us to the cutting edge of modern thinking.

Travelling to infinity, Jane Hawking

‘Travelling to Infinity’ is a moving and engaging memoir written by Stephen Hawking’s first wife about the turbulent years of her marriage with the astro-physics genius, her traumatic divorce and their recent reconciliation.

From eternity to here: the quest for the ultimate theory of time, Sean Carroll



Twenty years after Stephen Hawking’s 9-million-copy selling A Brief History of Time , pioneering theoretical physicist Sean Carroll takes our investigation into the nature of time to the next level. You can’t unscramble an egg and you can’t remember the future. But what if time doesn’t (or didn’t!) always go in the same direction? Carroll’s paradigm-shifting research suggests that other universes experience time running in the opposite direction to our own. Exploring subjects from entropy and quantum mechanics to time travel and the meaning of life, Carroll presents a dazzling new view of how we came to exist.

Time, Andy Goldsworthy

Time, always a crucial element in the work of Andy Goldsworthy both as a medium and as a metaphor is celebrated in this book. An introduction by the artist conveys the importance to him of time, change and place. A sequence of works made around his home in Scotland often shown in series recording their gradual disappearance or transformation is followed by Goldsworthy’s diaries of visits to five locations in North America and Europe, vividly evoking, in text and pictures, the process of exploration and response to each place.

Greetings, Carbon Based Bipeds! Arthur C Clarke



The reader is swept into the course of events and becomes an active and informed participant rather than a remote bystander. From predicting the role of geosynchronous satellites decades before they existed to his groundbreaking reporting from Kennedy Space Center in the 60s, to anticipating the internet decades before it happened, Clarke has acted both as technological prophet and cultural conscience, celebrating the great scientific powers of man — but simultaneously warning of the perils of a world where power and greed reign unchecked. Each essay has a new introduction by Clarke to provide perspective.

Why are black holes black? Thomas Canavan

How far could you throw a ball on the Moon? How much rubbish have humans left in space? How do astronauts go to the loo? Find out the answers to these questions and lots of other incredible facts about planet outer space. Bitesize chunks of information mean this book is full of stuff you’ve never even thought of on everything that is unique or impressive about the world we live in.

George’s Secret Key to the universe, Stephen & Lucy Hawking


George’s pet pig breaks through the fence into the garden next door – introducing him to his new neighbours: the scientist, Eric, his daughter, Annie, and a super-intelligent computer called Cosmos. And from that moment George’s life will never be the same again, for Cosmos can open a portal to any point in outer space . . .

George’s cosmic treasure hunt, Stephen & Lucy Hawking

‘We are going,’ said Annie, ‘on a great cosmic journey. So listen up, Savers of Planet Earth, and prepare to meet the Universe.’George’s best friend Annie needs help. Her scientist father, Eric, is working on a space project – and it’s all going wrong. A robot has landed on Mars, but is behaving very oddly. And now Annie has discovered something wierd on her dad’s super-computer. Is it a message from an alien? Could there be life out there? How do you find a planet in outer space? And if you could talk to aliens, what would you say?

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