British Science Week – 10-19 March

British Science Week Logo

March 10th to 19th marks British Science Week 2017

Hampshire Library Service love science and we have pulled together some of our favourite science titles into this book list to celebrate British Science Week.

A Brief History of Time Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking, one of the most brilliant theoretical physicists in history, wrote the modern classic A Brief History of Time to help non-scientists understand fundamental questions of physics and our existence: where did the universe come from? How and why did it begin? Will it come to an end, and if so, how?

The Selfish Gene Richard Dawkins

This is that rare thing – a book that changes science and reaches the public. From the moment of its publication 40 years ago, it has been a sparkling best-seller and a scientific game-changer. The gene-centred view of evolution that Dawkins championed and crystallized is now central both to evolutionary theorizing and to lay commentaries on natural history such as wildlife documentaries.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks Rebecca Skloot

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more. Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance.

Bad Science and Bad Pharma – Ben Goldacre

Bad Science is a book by British physician and academic Ben Goldacre, criticising mainstream media reporting on health and science issues. It contains extended and revised versions of many of his Guardian columns. Bad Pharma is  about the pharmaceutical industry, its relationship with the medical profession, and the extent to which it controls academic research into its own products.

Forces of Nature Brian Cox and Andrew Cohen

Forces of Nature is a 2016 book that accompanies the BBC One TV series of the same name. The book attempts to provide deep answers to simple questions, ranging from the nature of motion to the uniqueness of a snowflake. It uncovers how some of our planet’s beautiful sights and events are forged by just a handful of natural forces.

A Really Short History of Nearly Everything Bill Bryson

Bill’s own fascination with science began with a battered old schoolbook he had when he was about ten or eleven years old in America. It had an illustration that captivated him – a cutaway diagram showing Earth’s interior as it would look if you cut into it with a large knife and carefully removed about a quarter of its bulk. And he very clearly remembers thinking: “How do they know that?”. This book attempts to answer that question and more!

The Epigenetics Revolution Nessa Carey

Nessa Carey presents a compelling story of the most important revolution in modern biology – and what it could mean for humanity. She concludes by investigating the amazing possibilities for the improvement of humankind that epigenetics offers for the surprisingly near future.

 

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