International Day of Persons with Disabilities

3 December 2019

The UN celebrate this day every year on 3 December and the theme for this year is ‘Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership‘. Their aim is to ensure that all are treated equally and to make the world a more inclusive place.

Libraries have many different ways of being inclusive to all, some of those being dyslexia friendly books, large print, audiobooks and braille books.

Booktrust have created a list of books to read with your children and these are some of the few that we have on our library catalogue:

Song for a whale / Lynne Kelly.

Iris was born deaf, but she’s never let that define her; after all, it’s the only life she’s ever known. And until recently she wasn’t even very lonely, because her grandparents are both deaf, too. But Grandpa has just died and Grandma’s not the same without him. The only place Iris really feels at home anymore is in her electronics workshop where she loves taking apart antique radios. Then, during a science lesson about sound waves, Iris finds out about a whale who is unable to communicate with other whales. The lonely whale awakens something in Iris. She’s determined to show him that someone in the world knows he’s there.

Lightning chase me home / Amber Lee Dodd.

Amelia McLeod lives on a tiny Scottish island, her mum has walked out on her and she’s about to start at a whole new, scary school. Her dyslexia means she’s a target for the school bullies. When she makes a wish on her birthday to be reunited with her mum, she finds herself quite literally disappearing at times of stress and reappearing elsewhere on the island, where she finds clues and snapshots of her parents’ past.

Amazing / Steve Antony.

A little boy and his pet dragon are the very best of friends. They laugh, they sing, they dance, they snooze. They are both amazing – just like everyone else! A celebration of friendship and being yourself with a positive message about celebrating diversity.

Me and my sister / Rose Robbins.

This appealing brother and sister duo spend a lot of their day together, eating meals, going to school and playing. But life with an autistic sibling is not always easy. Through the eyes of the brother, we find out how they are both very different, but also very similar in other ways, and come what may they have lots of fun together and love each other just the same. This is a touching book that will strike a chord with every family with siblings, especially where one is differently abled.

Can you see me? : expected to fit in, proud to stand out / Libby Scott & Rebecca Westcott.

People think that because Tally’s autistic, she doesn’t realise what they’re thinking, but Tally sees and hears – and notices – all of it. Endearing, insightful and warmly uplifting, this is a story of autism, empathy and kindness that will touch readers of all ages.

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