Kazuo Ishiguro

Kazuo Ishiguro was born in Nagasaki, Japan, in 1954 and moved to Britain at the age of five. His fiction has earned him many honours around the world, including the Nobel Prize in Literature and the Booker Prize. His novels have been translated into over fifty languages and The Remains of the Day, Never Let Me Go and The White Countess have been made into acclaimed films.

Ishiguro was awarded a knighthood in 2018 for Services to Literature, he also holds the decorations of Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres from France and the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star from Japan.

His novel An Artist of the Floating world was nominated for the Book Prize in 1986 and won the Whitbread Book of the Year Award that same year.  In 1989 he won the Booker Prize for The Remains of the Day which later became an Oscar nominated film starring Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson.

His most recent novel Klara and the Sun explores the relationships between AI and humans as well as the enduring question of what it is to love. The Evening Standard says  “With its hushed intensity of emotion, this fable about robot love and loneliness confirms Ishiguro as a master prose stylist.”

Ishiguro doesn’t limit himself by genre or writing style, it is the unassuming, thoughtful prose which defines his work and draws the reader in with its intelligence and humanity. 

Books by Kazuo Ishiguro are also available to loan as eBooks, aAudio on the BorrowBox app.

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