‘Here be hogs’: Maps for local and family history in Hampshire

Maps have an instant appeal, giving us insight into the changing appearance over the centuries of our localities or the places where our families lived. This talk will introduce you to some of the key series of maps that cover most places in Hampshire, mainly from the 17th to 20th centuries, and will provide advice on how to use them.

It will be illustrated with examples from the collections of Hampshire Record Office, and will also include a few of the more quirky and intriguing maps you can see there.

This is an online talk using Zoom. Participants will be required to download and use Zoom.

Previous knowledge/experience required: All you need to attend a talk on Zoom is some basic computer skills and experience in using the internet. Don’t worry if you have not used it before as we will send you some basic guidance when you book.

You will receive an email confirming your booking from Hampshire Archives and Local Studies or Wessex Film and Sound Archive, which will contain the Zoom link.

Join us for this fantastic talk on Monday 19 July at 6pm. Tickets are just £5 and can be booked by clicking the ‘Book Now’ link.

Find My Past in Hampshire Libraries

Did you know with your Hampshire Libraries membership you have access to Find My Past on our library computers? Through Find My Past you can browse thousands of census, parish, military and migration records.

Ancestry Books

Hampshire Libraries also have a range of fantastic ancestry books that you can borrow, including the following titles. If you would like to reserve a copy of any of these books, just click on the book image.

Mark D. Herber provides a comprehensive illustrated guide to tracing British ancestry as far back as the Middle Ages. Chapters include advice on obtaining information from relatives, drawing a family tree, and researching census records.

Do you know where your forebears lived in 1840, 1915, 1943 – or what their house and locality was like? Maybe you are researching your own area. This guide shows you how three great land surveys can provide information on your ancestor’s home as well as fascinating historical snapshots of your area.

Family history should reveal more than facts and dates, lists of names and places – it should bring ancestors alive in the context of their times and the surroundings they knew – and research into local history records is one of the most rewarding ways of gaining this kind of insight into their world. That is why Jonathan Oates’s detailed introduction to these records is such a useful tool for anyone who is trying to piece together a portrait of family members from the past. In a series of concise and informative chapters he looks at the origins and importance of local history from the 16th century onwards and at the principal archives – national and local, those kept by government, councils, boroughs, museums, parishes, schools and clubs.

“We’re all ghosts. We all carry, inside us, people who came before us.”

Liam Callanan, The Cloud Atlas

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