Domestic violence

Domestic violence can be difficult subjects to talk about, books talking about the topic can help explain to young children what happened and encourage discussions. Stories may make difficult transitions easier to cope with and to understand.


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Kit Kitten and the Topsy-Turvey Feelings – Jane Evans and Izzy Bean

Another book from America, this one showing how hard it is when adults don’t teach children about feelings. Set against a background of implied neglect and, possibly, alcohol / drug abuse.
Age: 3+


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A Terrible Thing Happened – Margaret M Holmes and Cary Pillo

An American book that doesn’t show the ‘terrible thing’ that Sherman Smith saw, but instead focuses on how he feels afterwards and the help he is offered.
Age: 5+


At the end of Holyrood Lane – Dimity Powell

Flick is a happy child until the storms start at home. It looks at the unpredictability of home and how she needs to hide to find safety. When she asks for help her world changes and happiness returns.
Age 4+


Light Jar – Lisa Thompson

Nate and his mother run away from an abusive partner. They stay in a run down cottage in the grounds of a mansion. But Nate’s mum has disappeared and he must survive on his own whilst looking for her.
Age 10+


The Boy Who Sailed the Ocean in an Armchair – Lara Williamson

Dad has run away in the middle of the night, taking Becket and his little brother Billy with him.  They have left everything behind, including their almost-mum Pearl.  The boys badly want to bring their family back together, but things aren’t always as they seem.  The central theme of this book is of saying goodbye – to their late mother, to Pearl, even to Brian the snail.
Age: 9+


Useful Organisation

Women’s Aid

National charity working to end domestic violence against women and children

www.womensaid.org.uk

0808 2000 247

Bullying

Being bullied can be a confusing and scary experience. Sharing stories about similar situations can put a child’s mind at ease and help them find strategies and courage to deal with the bully.


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Topsy and Tim Help a Friend – Jean and Gareth Adamson

Stevie Dunton is unhappy at school because some of the children are picking on him.  Topsy and Tim speak to some grown-ups to help make the situation better.
Age: 4+


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Lucy and the Bully – Claire Alexander

Lucy the goat kid is bullied at nursery by Tommy the calf. All is sorted out and Tommy says sorry and Lucy forgives him. A reassuring tale to encourage children to tell their parents if they are bullied.
Age: 3+


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Willy the Wimp – Anthony Browne

Willy tries to change himself because he is teased for being a wimp. He commits a brave act but, in the end, is the same lovable Willy.
Age: 5+


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The Angel of Nitshill Road – Anne Fine

Amusing story about bullying at school. Outcome is assisted by magical means which lessens its usefulness.
Age: 8+


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Leave Me Alone – Kes Gray and Lee Wildish

With the help of some animal friends a small boy finds the strength to stand up to a giant bully who has been making him miserable.
Age: 4+


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Lion vs Rabbit – Alex Latimer

A nice story with good illustrations about getting the better of a bully.
Age: 4+


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Ben the Bully – Maggie Moore and Jan Smith

Ben was a mean bully.  Nobody wanted to be his friend.  Then little Joe decides he will play football with Ben and things start to change.
Age: 5+


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Bad Girls – Jacqueline Wilson and Nick Sharratt

A number of issues, including bullying, are tackled in this author’s usual humorous style as Mandy finds herself befriended by a girl who fails to meet her parents’ approval.
Age: 8+


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Monster Eyeballs – Jacqueline Wilson and Stephen Lewis

Mark is the class bully.  He loves scaring everyone, but has he met his match with Kate and the Monster Eyeballs?
Age: 5+


Useful Organisation

Kidscape
National charity helping to prevent bullying and child abuse

www.kidscape.org.uk

Bullying

Being bullied can be a confusing and scary experience. Sharing stories about similar situations can put a child’s mind at ease and help them find strategies and courage to deal with the bully.


Topsy and Tim Help a Friend
by Jean and Gareth Adamson

Stevie Dunton is unhappy at school because some of the children are picking on him.  Topsy and Tim speak to some grown-ups to help make the situation better.
Age: 4+


Image result for Lucy and the bully

Lucy and the Bully
by Claire Alexander

Lucy the goat kid is bullied at nursery by Tommy the calf. All is sorted out and Tommy says sorry and Lucy forgives him. A reassuring tale to encourage children to tell their parents if they are bullied.
Age: 3+

The hide and scare bear
by Ivan Bates

There once lived a naughty and mischievous bear who liked playing a game he called Hide and Scare. Then along came Rabbit, who offered advice a short rabbit lesson on how to be nice. But can a little rabbit show a big bear that there is a kinder way to play?
Age: 3+


Willy the Wimp
by Anthony Browne

Willy tries to change himself because he is teased for being a wimp. He commits a brave act but, in the end, is the same lovable Willy.
Age: 5+


The Angel of Nitshill Road
by Anne Fine

Amusing story about bullying at school. Outcome is assisted by magical means which lessens its usefulness.
Age: 8+


Image result for Leave me alone book cover

Leave Me Alone
by Kes Gray and Lee Wildish

With the help of some animal friends a small boy finds the strength to stand up to a giant bully who has been making him miserable.
Age: 4+


Lion vs Rabbit
by Alex Latimer

A nice story with good illustrations about getting the better of a bully.
Age: 4+


Image result for Dealing with bullying

Dealing With Bullying
by Jane Lacey and illustrated by Venitia Dean
Age range: 7+

This book teaches readers how to deal with bullies and make sure they don’t give in to peer pressure to bully others. It features seven stories from children who have a range of bullying problems from a girl who is being left out by her friends to a boy bullied for the way he speaks. It features both verbal and physical bullying. The stories help readers understand and empathise with characters, while also offering practical advice that readers can use in their everyday lives. The end of the book features a short playscript to act out and discuss.


Image result for Accidental trouble magnet

Accidental Trouble Magnet: (Planet Omar)
by Zanib Mian and illustrated by Nasaya Mafaridik
Age range: 6+

Planet Omar is a book about being different, growing friendships and overcoming hurdles.
Omar has just moved into a new house with his family: sticky-fingered little brother Esa, snooty older sister Maryam and his scientist parents. Going to a new school turns out to be okay, apart from the fact that class bully Daniel tells Omar that because he’s a Muslim, he’s going to be kicked out of the country and will have to go and live in Pakistan. Understandably worried, Omar asks his cousin if that’s true, and both hope it isn’t, because there’s a distinct lack of good pizza there. Plus, there’s mean Mrs Rogers next door who complains loudly about Omar’s mum frying onions.
Yet when mean Mrs Rogers has an accident, Omar’s family is there to help. And when Omar and bully Daniel get stranded on a school trip in London, Omar realises that Danny isn’t so tough after all…


Ben the Bully
by Maggie Moore and Jan Smith

Ben was a mean bully.  Nobody wanted to be his friend.  Then little Joe decides he will play football with Ben and things start to change.
Age: 5+


Mud boy: a story about bullying
by Sarah Siggs

This illustrated story is designed to be read with children aged 5+ who have experienced or seen bullying or teasing. Sam’s story gently evokes how it feels to be bullied and shows how talking to other people helps. It is a great discussion starter for kids and adults, and empowers children to see how they can change things for the better.
Age: 5+


Bad Girls
by Jacqueline Wilson and Nick Sharratt

A number of issues, including bullying, are tackled in this author’s usual humorous style as Mandy finds herself befriended by a girl who fails to meet her parents’ approval.
Age: 8+


Monster Eyeballs
by Jacqueline Wilson and Stephen Lewis

Mark is the class bully.  He loves scaring everyone, but has he met his match with Kate and the Monster Eyeballs?
Age: 5+


Useful Organisations

Kidscape
National charity helping to prevent bullying and child abuse

Domestic violence and abuse

Domestic violence can be difficult subjects to talk about, books talking about the topic can help explain to young children what happened and encourage discussions. Stories may make difficult transitions easier to cope with and to understand.


Kit Kitten and the Topsy-Turvey Feelings
by Jane Evans and Izzy Bean

Another book from America, this one showing how hard it is when adults don’t teach children about feelings. Set against a background of implied neglect and, possibly, alcohol / drug abuse.
Age: 3+


A Terrible Thing Happened
by Margaret M Holmes and Cary Pillo

An American book that doesn’t show the ‘terrible thing’ that Sherman Smith saw, but instead focuses on how he feels afterwards and the help he is offered.
Age: 5+


At the end of Holyrood Lane
by Dimity Powell

Flick is a happy child until the storms start at home. It looks at the unpredictability of home and how she needs to hide to find safety. When she asks for help her world changes and happiness returns.
Age 4+


Image result for bereavement The Boy Who Built a Wall Around Himself"

The Boy Who Built a Wall Around Himself
by Ali Redford and illustrated by Kara Simpson
Age range: 4+

Boy built a wall to keep himself safe. Behind it he felt strong and more protected. Then Someone Kind came along. She bounced a ball, sang and painted on the other side of the wall, and Boy began to wonder if life on the other side might be better after all. Written for children aged 4 to 9, this gentle full-colour picture book uses a simple metaphor to explain how children who have had painful or traumatic experiences can build barriers between themselves and other people. It will help children explore their feelings and encourage communication.


Some Secrets Should Never Be Kept
by Jayneen Sanders

This book is a reassuring story , designed to be used by an adult and a child together to explore the difference between appropriate and inappropriate touching.The young boy is encouraged to share his secret with his mother.
Age: 3+


Light Jar
by Lisa Thompson

Nate and his mother run away from an abusive partner. They stay in a run down cottage in the grounds of a mansion. But Nate’s mum has disappeared and he must survive on his own whilst looking for her.
Age 10+


The Boy Who Sailed the Ocean in an Armchair
by Lara Williamson

Dad has run away in the middle of the night, taking Becket and his little brother Billy with him.  They have left everything behind, including their almost-mum Pearl.  The boys badly want to bring their family back together, but things aren’t always as they seem.  The central theme of this book is of saying goodbye – to their late mother, to Pearl, even to Brian the snail.
Age: 9+


Useful Organisation

Citizen’s Advice:
Information, support and advice for both men and women.

Gov.uk:
Information and advice.

IDAS:
Supporting both men and women who are experiencing domestic abuse.

NHS:
Information and advice.

Refuge:
For women and children against domestic abuse.

Victim support:
Information and support for victims of domestic abuse.

Women’s Aid:
National charity working to end domestic violence against women and children

Young Minds:
Advice and information on places you can get help for children who have witness domestic violence or abuse.

Spilling the Beans by Clarissa Dixon Wright

About the book

Clarissa was born into wealth and privilege, as a child, shooting and hunting were the norm and pigeons were flown in from Cairo for supper. Her mother was an Australian heiress, her father was a brilliant surgeon to the Royal family. But he was also a tyrannical and violent drunk who used to beat her and force her to eat carrots with slugs still clinging to them. Clarissa was determined and clever, though, and her ambition led her to a career in the law. At the age of 21, she was the youngest ever woman to be called to the Bar. Disaster struck when her adored mother died suddenly. It was to lead to a mind-numbing decade of wild over-indulgence. Rich from her inheritance, in the end Clarissa partied away her entire fortune. It was a long, hard road to recovery along which Clarissa finally faced her demons and turned to the one thing that had always brought her joy – cooking. Now at last she has found success, sobriety and peace. With the stark honesty and the brilliant wit we love her for, Clarissa recounts the tale of a life lived to extremes. A vivid and funny story, it is as moving as it is a cracking good read.

 

Reviewed by Sway Library Society

A very interesting biography – an honest account of alcoholism and an amazing life. Enjoyable”

star rating ****

 

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