Books and me: On my shelves with Sam Peters

Honest autobiographies, elegant crime fiction, and Disability History Month. We caught up with Library Manager Sam Peters to hear about the books that are most important to her.

Where is your favourite place to read?

As a child I used to love reading on the stairs. One of the houses I grew up in had this curved staircase with a sunny spot part of the way down, and that used to make a perfect little place to read in. I also have a really vivid memory of reading the Harry Potter series one Christmas at my friend’s home in Amsterdam. It was the first time I had been away for Christmas and whenever I reread Harry Potter now, certain parts of the story transport me straight back to that sofa in Holland. These days it’s more about when I can find the time to read, so that is often in the staff room on my lunch breaks.

How do you read?

I love an audiobook and Borrowbox is brilliant for that, I think we’re so fortunate to have something like Borrowbox available to us.  I think if you’re not a big reader, or you find reading hard, or you just don’t have that much free time, audiobooks are a brilliant way to still have access to those stories. I enjoy the stories that have been dramatised and sound like radio plays. I listen to a lot of the older detective stories because I find the period really interesting, the Paul Temple series is one of my favourites, but I’m a big fan of Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey stories too.

If I’m not listening to an audiobook, I like to read a paperback book. Every now and then I’ll come across a great book that I really enjoy and it’s so hard to put it down. I had that with both of Richard Osman’s books, The Thursday Murder Club and The Man Who Died Twice. I just carried them around the house and kept reading. They’re just so funny and I love the setting of the retirement village.

What are you reading at the moment?

I definitely read more fiction than non-fiction. For me, reading is a way to escape to somewhere different as much as anything else, but I have been reading some interesting autobiographies lately. Ellie Taylor’s My Child and Other Mistakes talks about her becoming a mother and her introduction to motherhood in a really funny and feminist way which was nice to read.

Right now, I’m juggling two autobiographies but they’re both really quite different. I’m reading The Storytellerby Dave Grohl and My Unapologetic Diaries by Joan Collins. Dave Grohl’s book is quite a structured look at the bands and music that influenced him, whereas Joan Collins has literally published her uncensored diaries across a certain period of time. So, although they’re both autobiographies, they read totally differently.

I’ve also just finished The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo which I just couldn’t put down. It’s a perfect read for anyone that loves a strong female lead. It’s very much about the character of Evelyn and her life, her husbands are a very small part of her story. 

Reading patterns

When I was younger, I would just go to the section of the library with surnames that matched the authors that I liked to see what books were there, but I think now I’m quite comfortable with what I like to read. I’m a fan of what I call ‘elegant crime fiction’. I love crime fiction, but I don’t like all the gory bits. I stick to the more mainstream books from the genre because I don’t want to risk reading something I won’t enjoy as my reading time is very precious. I don’t like leaving a book unfinished so I’ll always keep reading in the hopes that it will get better.

First loves, best loves

I was given a copy of Jane Eyre for my eleventh birthday and I just loved Jane. I thought she was so brave and strong, and her story is so interesting. Reading it as an adult I definitely pick up on parts that went over my head as a child. But it’s all about her choices and what she wants, and, for the period it was written, I think that’s actually really significant.

Another one of my favourites when I younger was An Inspector Calls by J.B. Priestley which I had to read for my GCSEs. I absolutely adored it and over the years I’ve seen it performed three or four times. It’s one that I always try to introduce people to if they don’t know it and about two years ago, I took my teenage children to see it and they loved it too.

As a crime fiction fan one of my favourites has to be Agatha Christie. I liked that she wrote female murderers, though the idea that a woman could do such wicked acts caused some controversy at the time. She allowed women to be complex and central characters and I think that’s a lot of why her books are still relevant today. If you compare Thursday Murder Club with Miss Marple, Richard Osman has clearly taken inspiration from Christie.

I went to Burgh Island in Devon a few years ago which is where And Then There Were None was set. Much of my bucket list is about visiting the places that Agatha Christie set her books, going on the Orient Express is pretty high up on the list.

Another author I love is Simon Brett. When I first started off with Hampshire Libraries, we sent him an email just to test the water and see if he would consider doing an event with us. He replied and was really excited and offered to do the event for free because he said he really wanted to support the library. I met him at Lymington Library and was the nicest he could have been I really enjoyed seeing him.

Overlooked delights

As it’s Disability History Month I’ve been reading Take Up Thy Bed and Walk by Lois Keith. It talks about the issues with how disability is presented in society and the histories of these ideas. Like in stories such as Pollyanna, where the disabled character is punished for wrongdoing, or the disability that the lead character has must be cured for the story to be resolved. I think it’s really important to talk about how these views in the world are formed because we’re still having to fight a lot of them. As someone with what would be classed as a hidden disability, it’s something that’s close to my heart and I’m glad that we can enable these conversations in the library with some of the brilliant books we have. I think reading can be a great way to challenge our pre-conceived notions or unconscious bias.

Sam Peters is a Library Manager covering the libraries within the Avon and forest areas of the New Forest. Sam was speaking with Isaac Fravashi.

Books and Me: On my shelves with Jayne Mushore

Jayne Mushore, Project Support Officer at Hampshire Libraries, speaks with us about empowering reads, childhood joys and the complexities of international identities.

Click on any of the book images to reserve that title.

Where’s your favourite place to read?

I used to commute between Middlesbrough and London so a lot of my reading happened on the train, but I love listening to audiobooks in the car too – you can just put something on and drive, it’s a great way to pass the time. But for me, the best place to read is on holiday. Looking out across the sea without a care in the world, just getting completely lost in the book. I’m not rushing to get here or there I’m not rushing to do anything. There’s just that chilled vibe, knowing I don’t have to put the book down until I’m quite ready. I can just get lost in the pages.

How do you read?

I always read a fiction and non-fiction book at the same time. Sometimes the non-fiction becomes too much and I’ll need something more exciting and that’s when I’ll switch to the fiction book. With fiction, you have to conjure those images in your mind to picture how the scene would look and so I can’t read two fiction books at the same time. In an ideal world, I would love to start a book and finish it in one sit-in, but with work and home life, I really have to make time. So I take any chance I get to just sit down and read.

I love audiobooks and I use BorrowBox a lot. I would say my reading is about 50/50 between audiobooks and physical books. When someone is reading the book aloud to you, they will put the emphasis on parts that wouldn’t necessarily stand out to you. But when you read something yourself, you can pause on the parts that resonate with you personally. So while I love audiobooks I do really like to read a book myself when I can.

What are you reading at the moment?

I’m currently reading Slay In Your Lane by Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinene. It’s a non-fiction book of black British women telling the story of their experience stepping on the career ladder. It talks about the challenges that they faced and how they navigate the working world. For example, one of the women talks about how they created a lingerie line for women of colour, producing tights that work for different skin tones. If it isn’t something you think about it can seem small, and if you don’t have the option, it may not be something you think you need. But actually, being able to wear something that works with your body is great and it’s really important for somebody to have that option.

“The quest for good is a marathon and not a sprint; it is measured over years, not fleeting moments; over failures and missteps and, of course, successes.” – Slay In Your Lane

The other book I’m reading is Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor. I haven’t finished it yet but it’s quite out there and the cover really caught my eye. It’s about a girl who is communicating with spirits but is cursed by her community as her conception was from rape. It’s set in Africa and over the last year a lot of the novels I’ve been reading are Africa-based. I love reading about Africa in fiction, it’s always brought to life so differently each time, particularly in Who Fears Death. It’s quite different from any book I’ve read.

Reading patterns

I don’t really follow a genre or author in particular, I usually pick my books by going onto the library’s online catalogue to see what’s new and what catches my attention. Book covers really do grab me, they make me curious and tempt me to find out more. That may sound like a weird way to pick what you read but I always find something interesting by just having a browse. My friends and I always make recommendations to each other when we’ve read a really good book too. Slay In Your Lane was one that was a recommendation, I think it stood out because it’s such an empowering read for young black women.

I tend to read with my mood so if everything is going well, I will read quite uplifting books but if I’m going through something they’ll take a darker turn. Last year with the pandemic I was in the headspace of questioning a lot of things in my life and I couldn’t really be in “the now”. My friend recommended The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle and it really kept me going through lockdown.

First love, best loves

I’m from Zimbabwe so most of what I remember reading at a young age was in my native language. When I started learning English, I remember I used to read a lot of Roald Dahl and Enid Blyton’s The Secret Seven series. Fantastic Mr Fox is the book that really stands out from my childhood. A talking fox sneaking around being mischievous was hilarious to me. The world in the story was so different from our way of life in Africa I found it so intriguing. When I was a bit older one of my school friends had the Harry Potter books, I remember we read a few chapters of the prisoner of Azkaban and started asking ourselves “should we be doing this?”. With my African background and the Christian culture I grew up in, reading about witches wasn’t really acceptable. It shows how different attitudes can be as well because that was quite a big thing and we felt so wrong we didn’t end up finishing it!
The Devil Wears Prada was one of my favourites too, I remember being really excited to get a hold of the second book when it came out. The Hunger Games series was another big favourite of mine as well, but I remember reading a lot of John Grisham novels too. He was a lawyer before he became a writer, and The Firm is one I really remember enjoying.

The series of books I used to really love was The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency – I used to read the books over and over again, I think I know them by heart! Reading about this strong African woman who’s doing exciting things was really thrilling. They hold real sentimental value to me, I remember thinking “I want to be that woman who’s out there getting stuff done!”

A book I really connected with recently was We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo. Bulawayo is from Zimbabwe too and reading the book brought back so many memories. In the book, she writes about being playing ‘countries’ outside as children like I used to growing up. I can really understand the perspective she writes from. The main character, Darling, witnesses the violence happening in Zimbabwe as she’s growing up and doesn’t really understand what’s going on and then she moves to America. Something that made me quite emotional when I was reading the book is when she’s in America and calls a friend back home. The friend says that Darling can’t say ‘our country’ when talking about Zimbabwe because she decided to leave. I can relate to that because the friends and all the things you used to hold dear that built your friendship are no longer there. You don’t belong in Zimbabwe anymore, but you don’t feel as if you belong in this new world yet either. You’re in limbo. You’re very grateful for the opportunities you’ve found in this new world but trying to fit in parts of your old life with it is really hard. Then when you try to connect with the people back at home to say, “I’m one of you still”, they reject you and so you don’t know where you stand. It was very bittersweet to read about that through the story of Darling in We Need New Names. Everyone I know who has read the book and has migrated has agreed that this book perfectly tells the story of how it feels.

Overlooked Delights

Maya Angelou’s Letter to My Daughter was extremely endearing and touching to me. I think the message of teaching a girl-child to be independent and themselves. That message of keeping going and finding your strength really resonated with my upbringing and some of what I witnessed as part of my cultural background. Reading a book like this, where somebody is really holding out their heart and saying, “things happen and life is hard but you do need to keep moving because there is light at the end of the tunnel”, is just so powerful to me.

“You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.” – Letter to My Daughter

Jayne Mushore is the Project Support Officer for the digital initiatives of Hampshire Libraries, working to deliver services such as the publicly accessible computers and the procurement of audiobooks. Jayne was speaking with Isaac Fravashi.

Junior Audiobook Month 2019

Audiobooks are a great way to continue to enjoy books while on the go! Whether it’s on the way to or from school, on a longer car, bus or train journey or just to relax before bed; audiobooks will ensure you can continue to enjoy books, even if you don’t have the time to sit down and read them.
Not only do we have CDs, MP3 CDs and playaways that you can borrow from the library, you’re also able to download eAudiobooks straight to your tablet or mobile device using the BorrowBox app!

There are audiobooks for everyone and there is so much choice!
CDs or MP3 CDs that you can put into a CD player or computer to listen to.
Playaways where all you need is an AAA battery and headphones and you’re good to go – the playaway is even small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, in your pocket or bag.
eAudiobooks from BorrowBox, that you can download straight into your phone and bring with you wherever you go.

Here’s just some of the awesome books you can find as audiobooks through Hampshire Libraries:

A Treasury of Animal Stories
Written by Holly Webb
Read by Phyllida Nash
Suitable for 5+
A Treasury of Animal Stories

A scruffy pup eagerly awaits a new home just in time for Christmas, a little girl discovers an adorable kitten in her garden, a dog makes an unlikely new friend, a hamster makes a daring escape and a girl tries to help a family of fluffy ducklings.

Chloe centre stage
Written by Holly Webb
Read by Rosie Jones
Suitable for 6+

Chloe may have passed the audition for the Shine School for Performing Arts with flying colours, but that’s only the first challenge. As Chloe strives to stand out, her first term is more dramatic than she could ever have imagined.

Rainbow Dash and the Daring Do Double Dare
Written by G. M. Berrow
Read by Tracey Petrillo
Suitable for 6+
Rainbow Dash and the Daring Do Double Dare

Rainbow Dash is a huge fan of the Daring Do book series, but after the newest book comes out, she’s not alone! Suddenly, every pony in Ponyville is reading the books! To prove she’s the ultimate fan, Rainbow Dash decides to show her friends that she can be just as brave and ‘daring’ as her hero.

Amelia Fang and the half moon holiday
Written by Laura Ellen Anderson
Read by Zoe Thorne
Suitable for 7+

Amelia and her friends are back in Nocturnia, but there’s a new villain to battle! This evil creature is stealing everyone’s memories. How can Amelia save Nocturnia when no one can remember who she is?

Captain Underpants and the big, bad battle of the Bionic Booger Boy. Part 1, The night of the nasty nostril nuggets
Written by Dav Pilkey
Read by Len Forgione, Dazjon Freeman and Ben D’Amico
Suitable for 7+
Captain Underpants #6

George and Harold are back – in another truly icky adventure. When class boffin Melvin Sneedly goes too far with his latest amazing invention, the Bionic Booger Boy comes to sticky, snotty, really bad-tempered life.

Diary of a wimpy kid series
Written by Jeff Kinney
Read by Dan Russell
Suitable for 8+
The Long Haul (Diary of a Wimpy Kid book 9)

Greg Heffley finds himself thrust into a new year and a new school where undersize weaklings share the corridors with kids who are taller, meaner and already shaving. Greg is happy to have his sidekick, Rowley, along for the ride. When Rowley’s star starts to rise, Greg tries to use his best friend’s popularity to his own advantage.

The Burning Bridge
Written by John Flanagan
Read by William Zappa
Suitable for 8+
The Burning Bridge

As the Kingdom of Araluen prepares for war against Morgarath, Will and Horace accompany the Ranger Gilan on a mission to Celtica. But Celtica’s villages and mines are silent. Only an exhausted and starving girl called Evanlyn can tell them why: Morgarath has sent his foul creatures to enslave the Celts. While Gilan rides swiftly back to Araluen to report this news to the King, Will and Horace discover the true purpose behind Morgarath’s actions. The Kingdom is sure to be defeated in a surprise three-sided attack – unless they can find a way to prevent it.

The wicked king
Written by Holly Black
Read by Caitlin Kelly
Suitable for 13+
The Wicked King

When it becomes all too clear that someone close to Jude means to betray her, Jude must uncover the traitor and fight her own complicated feelings for Cardan to maintain control as a mortal in a Faerie world. Dramatic and thrilling fantasy blends with contemporary storytelling to create a fully realised world, filled with magic, politics and treachery.

Magnus Chase and the Ship of the Dead
Written by Rick Riordan
Read by Michael Crouch
Suitable for 13+
Magnus Chase and the Ship of the Dead

Loki the trickster god is free from his chains. Now he’s readying Naglfar, the Ship of the Dead, armed with a host of giants and zombies, to sail against the Norse gods and begin the final battle of Ragnarok. It’s up to Magnus Chase and his friends to stop Loki’s plans, but to do so they will have to sail across the oceans of Midgard, Jotunheim and Niflheim in a desperate race to reach Naglfar before it’s ready to sail on Midsummer’s Day.

Fallen
Written by Lauren Kate
Read by Justine Eyre
Suitable for 14+
Fallen

What if the person you were meant to be with could never be yours?
Seventeen-year-old Lucinda falls in love with a gorgeous, intelligent boy, Daniel, at her new school, the grim, foreboding Sword & Cross only to find out that Daniel is a fallen angel, and that they have spent lifetimes finding and losing one another as good and evil forces plot to keep them apart.

Birdy Flynn
Written by Helen Donohoe
Read by Caroline Lennon
Suitable for 15+
Birdy Flynn

There is the secret of Birdy’s dead grandmother’s cat – how the boys tortured it and Birdy Flynn had to drown her in the river to stop her suffering. There’s the secret of Mrs Cope, the popular teacher, who touched Birdy in the cupboard. There’s the secret of the gypsy girl at school who Birdy likes, but she can’t tell anyone. Because Birdy’s other secret is that while she plays and fights as good as the boys, she is a girl, and she doesn’t always feel like a girl is supposed to.

There’s even more amazing audiobooks to discover through the library or through the BorrowBox app; there’s something for all ages! Download the app today or visit your local library to get started!

Audiobook Month 2019

We love books! Reading them, holding them, smelling them – we just love them! But like many others in the 21st Century we sometimes struggle to find the time to sit down with a book. There are just too many things that needs doing; housework, homework, walking the dog, taking the kids to swimming or football, cooking – the list goes on!

But don’t despair! We have found the solution; audiobooks!
These books on CDs, playaways and downloadable books are the answer to every busy booklover’s book-despair.

Through the BorrowBox app you can download eAudiobooks straight to your phone, tablet or memory stick to enjoy on your way to work, while taking the dog for a walk or any time you want to read a book but adulthood is getting in the way.

From libraries you can borrow audiobooks on CDs, MP3 CDs or playaways – brilliant to use while doing housework or even on those long car journeys with the family.

There are audiobooks for everyone and there is so much choice!

CDs or MP3 CDs that you can put into a CD player or computer to listen to.

Playaways where all you need is an AAA battery and headphones and you’re good to go – the playaway is even small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, in your pocket or bag.

eAudiobooks from BorrowBox, that you can download straight into your phone and bring with you wherever you go.

All these different formats mean audiobooks are available to an even greater audience then it ever has been. From young children to elderly, from busy parents to not-as-busy-but-still-busy adults – there is something for everyone!

Not only do we have a wide range of audiobooks, eAudiobooks are free to download through the BorrowBox app too!
Children’s audiobooks, in all formats, are completely free for everyone and are brilliant on those long car journeys.

Are you more of a magazine or newspaper kind of person? Then you might be interested in one of our other great audio service available from libraries in Hampshire; National Talking Newspapers and Magazines!
This service is available for anyone that struggle reading printed text and all that one need to do is bring a USB stick into a Hampshire Library and us which of the 90+ titles you would like to have and it will be added to the memory stick for you to enjoy at home. It’s another amazing free service offered in libraries.

This year’s suggested reads are rather exciting, from thrillers to romance and from fantasy to non-fiction! This list is just adult fiction and non-fiction books, for the teen and children list; head over to our junior Audiobook Month 2019 blog!
Have a look through these titles, who knows, maybe you will find your next read!


18th abduction
Written by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
Read by Pat Starr
Format: CDs

When three female schoolteachers go missing in San Francisco, Detective Lindsay Boxer must unravel the mystery of their disappearance. But what starts as a missing person case quickly escalates to a troubling murder investigation. As pressure at work mounts, Lindsay must rely on her husband Joe to support her at home. Yet Joe is pursuing a mysterious case himself, as a woman running from her past brings him terrifying information – the notorious war criminal from her Eastern European home country has appeared on the streets of San Francisco. As Lindsay searches for the three missing women, a frightening new twist forces her and Joe’s investigations to collide. His mystery informant has gone missing, and all four abducted women are in grave danger. As shocking revelations emerge, Lindsay and Joe find themselves caught up in an international crime operation unlike anything they’ve seen before.


Terminal
Written by Kathy Reichs
Read by Cristin Milioti
Format: eAudiobook
Terminal

A terrifying new Virals adventure for Tory Brennan – great niece of Dr Temperance Brennan – and the Virals team as they come face to face with their greatest enemy. Tory Brennan and the Virals are forced to confront the existence of a rival pack – The Trinity – who wants them off the scene – declaring war by engraving ‘One Territory. One Pack’ on a local landmark. What’s more this pack’s powers seem stronger and their eyes glow red rather than golden when they flare.
Chance Claybourne, who now owns his father’s pharmaceutical company, shares The Trinity’s powers – he accidentally infected himself and his ex-lab tech Will Speckman. Chance claims he’s on Virals’ side but can they trust him? And if Speckman is one of The Trinity, who are the other two?
As the tension mounts between the two packs an even greater threat looms. Covert government agents are closing in on them, determined to find out exactly how their powers work, to experiment on them. Have The Trinity pack given them Virals to save themselves? Or are both packs at risk?


The Library of Lost and Found
Written by Phaedra Patrick
Read by Sarah Borges
Format: eAudiobook
The Library of Lost and Found

Librarian Martha Storm has always found it easier to connect with books than people—though not for lack of trying. She keeps careful lists of how to help others in her superhero-themed notebook. And yet, sometimes it feels like she’s invisible.

All of that changes when a book of fairy tales arrives on her doorstep. Inside, Martha finds a dedication written to her by her best friend—her grandmother Zelda—who died under mysterious circumstances years earlier. When Martha discovers a clue within the book that her grandmother may still be alive, she becomes determined to discover the truth. As she delves deeper into Zelda’s past, she unwittingly reveals a family secret that will change her life forever.Filled with Phaedra Patrick’s signature charm and vivid characters, The Library of Lost and Found is a heart-warming reminder that even the quietest life has the potential to be extraordinary.


Into the World
Written by Stephanie Parkyn
Read by Ulli Birvé
Format: eAudiobook
Into the World

1791. In the midst of the French Revolution, unwed mother Marie-Louise Girardin takes one last look at her baby son before entrusting him to her friend, the revolutionary Olympe de Gouges. She must escape, and only the most daring plan will bring her both the anonymity she needs and the independence to return one day for her son.
Marie-Louise disguises herself as a man and joins a voyage of exploration employed as a steward on the Recherche, one of two ships commissioned to journey to the Great Southern Ocean to find the missing explorer La Perouse.
Inspired by a true story, Into the World is a compelling novel of the amazing life of Marie-Louise Girardin battling perilous seas, her own self-doubt, and finding unforeseen loves on a journey to reclaim her child.


After you left
Written by Carol Mason
Read by Elizabeth Knowelden
Format: MP3 CD

When Justin walks out on Alice on their honeymoon, with no explanation apart from a cryptic note, Alice is left alone and bewildered, her life in pieces. Then she meets Evelyn, a visitor to the gallery where she works. It’s a seemingly chance encounter, but Alice gradually learns that Evelyn has motives, and a heartbreaking story, of her own. And that story has haunting parallels with Alice’s life. As Alice delves into the mystery of why Justin left her, the questions are obvious. But the answers may lie in the most unlikely of places.


Something to Tell You
Written by Lucy Diamond
Read by Clare Wille
Format eAudiobook
Something to Tell You


15 minutes to happiness: easy, everyday exercises to help you be the best you can be
Written by Richard Nicholls
Read by Richard Nicholls
Format: Playaway

Through his incredibly popular podcast, Motivate Yourself, registered psychotherapist Richard Nicholls set out to cut through some of the myths and misconceptions about self-help and offer effective solutions to real-life problems. In his first book, Nicholls looks at the science behind what works and what doesn’t when it comes to making ourselves happy. He discusses how little changes to our thoughts, emotions, lifestyle, attitude, self-esteem, health and social interaction can dramatically improve our lives, and includes easy 15-minute tasks to integrate into your day that are proven to help with happiness and wellbeing.


Big week
Written by James Holland
Read by Charles Armstrong
Format: CDs

During the third week of February 1944, the combined Allied air forces launched their first-ever round-the-clock bomber offensive against Germany. The aim was to smash the main factories and production centres of the Luftwaffe and draw the German fighter force up into the air and into battle. Officially called Operation ARGUMENT, this monumental air assault very quickly became known simply as Big Week. Following the fortunes of pilots, aircrew and civilians from both sides, ‘Big Week’ is a blistering narrative of one of the most critical periods of the entire war, one that culminated in the largest air battle ever witnessed.


Mary Queen of Scots
Written by John Guy
Read by Jan Cramer
Format eAudiobook
Mary Queen of Scots

Who was the real Mary Queen of Scots? The most enigmatic ruler of England lived a life of incredible drama and turmoil: crowned Queen of Scotland at nine months old, and Queen of France at sixteen years, she grew up in the crosshairs of Europe’s political battles to become Queen Elizabeth’s arch rival.This audiobook tells the story of the fraught and dangerous relationship between these two women of incredible charisma and power – a relationship that began with both seeking a political settlement, but which led them down a path of danger, from which only one could emerge victorious.


Dare Not Linger; The Presidential Years
Written by Nelson Mandela and Mandla Langa
Read by Adrian Lester
Format: eAudiobook
Dare Not Linger


Is there an audiobook you think should have made it to the list? Tell us in the comments below, and don’t forget to subscribe to not miss out on future blogs!