Author of the Month: Dorothy Koomson

Our author of the month for October is the brilliant Dorothy Koomson.

Born in 1971, Dorothy Koomson is a bestselling author of adult fiction books with over 2 million books sold. She has earned her title ‘The Queen of the Big Reveal’ with her nail-biting psychological thrillers, which pack an emotionally devastating punch.

Dorothy Koomson has been a strong advocate for Black authors to write the stories they want to tell without compromising their vision.

Try her latest novel ‘My Other Husband’ which critics are calling one of her best yet. This expertly crafted novel is full of twists and turns sure to keep you on the edge of your seat.

Check out our full catalogue of Dorothy Koomson titles.

Author of the Month: Haruki Murakami

August 2022

Biography

Haruki Murakami was born in 1949 to middle class parents in Kyoto, the cultural capital of Japan. However, at an early age the family moved to the bustling port town of Kobe, where a young Murakami was exposed to American culture through books, movies and jazz music. Murakami studied drama at Waseba University in Tokyo, where he expanded his reading and developed a taste for Western writers such as Jack Kerouac, Franz Kafka and Kurt Vonnegut. After completing his studies, Murakami and his wife Yoko opened a coffee house and jazz club in Tokyo called the ‘Peter Cat’. Murakami began to write during this time, publishing his first novel Hear the Wind Singin 1979 at the age of 29. This debut novel would win the well-respected Gunzo Prize for New Writers (1979) and convince Murakami to continue writing.

Career

Murakami’s writing does not sit easily within the cannon of Japanese literature, and for much of his career he has been seen as an outsider due to the American influences in his novels. Murakami’s novels are generally seen as examples of magical realism. However, the plot and style of his novels are eclectic at best and defy all attempts at categorisation. Murakami has characterised himself as a conduit from his own subconscious to that of the reader, expressed through his dreamlike and often experimental prose. Common themes in his work include cats, baseball, jazz, classical music and the Beatles.

Following on from Hear the Wind Sing (1979) Murakami would complete a trilogy of works with A Wild Sheep Chase (1982). The novel was successful in Japan and received critical praise from Western reviewers. However, Norwegian Wood (1987) was the novel which would bring Murakami to his widest audience yet. It became a sensation in Japan and then abroad (in 1989), selling more than 1 million copies in the first 7 days of its release and 3.5 million in its first year. Murakami has been a household name in Japan since, with fans going to great lengths to meet the famously reclusive author.

Awards and Accolades

Some of Murakami’s most notable works include The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (1995) which won the Yomiuri Literary Award and Kafka on the Shore (2002) which received a World Fantasy Award for its English translation in 2006. Murakami has also received a Hans Christian Anderson Award (2016) and an America Award in Literature (2018) for lifetime achievement in writing. Notable exceptions to this trend include Murakami’s three volume novel 1Q84 (2009-2010) which has been voted one of the greatest novels of the last 30 years in Japan but received poor reviews with Western critics and fans. For first time readers A Wild Sheep Chase or Norwegian Wood are a great place to start, while Murakami’s short story collections are interesting and challenging in shorter manageable chunks.

Links  

The Paris Review – Haruki Murakami, The Art of Fiction No. 182

The Guardian – Haruki Murakami: ‘You have to go through the darkness before you get to the light’

The New Yorker – The Underground Worlds of Haruki Murakami

Haruki Murakami – Author

NPR – Haruki Murakami: ‘I’ve had All Sorts of Strange Experiences in My Life’

Fantastic Fiction – Haruki Murakami

Find Murakami’s books here

“If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.” – Haruki Murakami

Author of the Month: Marian Keyes

Early Biography  
Marian Keyes is an Irish author born in 1963, who grew up in and around Dublin as part of a large family. Keyes completed degrees in law and business, moving to London in 1986 to take on an administrative role. However, Keyes began to struggle with alcoholism and depression in her twenties, eventually attempting to take her own life in 1995. Keyes underwent rehabilitation for her alcoholism in Dublin and began working on short stories, based in part on her own experiences. Keyes submitted these stories to the publisher Poolberg Press, with the promise of a novel to follow. The novel she submitted, Watermelon (1995), would become a best seller in Ireland and launch her career as an author. While Keyes has struggled with mental health difficulties for most of her adult life, she has described her writing as a ‘rope across the abyss’ which has given her the strength in times of crisis. Keyes has been sober now for over 25 years and lives with her husband Tony in Dún Laoghaire, Dublin. 

Work and Career  
Keyes’ works are darkly comic but insightful novels, often based on her own experiences. They cover sensitive topics such as mental illness, divorce, substance abuse and domestic violence while maintaining a tact and approachability which makes them instant favourites with readers. While Keyes’ books tackle heavy topics, their tone and narrative are optimistic and uplifting with a happy ending for all your favourite characters. Keyes main series is the Walsh Family novels, where we join the Walsh Sisters as they navigate the ups and downs of modern life. Watermelon (1995) is the First book in the series, while her latest work Again, Rachel (2022) is the most recent addition. Despite being associated with the genre, Keyes has been a strong critic of the term ‘chick-lit’ and its ‘belittling’ and ‘demeaning’ connotations. Equally, Keyes is a strong feminist and has drawn attention to differences in the way that male and female written works are represented and awarded.  

Accolades, Awards and Statistics 

Keyes is the British Book Awards Author of the Year 2022, recognised for her ‘expert storytelling, incredible warmth of heart, and significant contributions to the publishing industry over three decades of writing’. She has sold over 33 million books worldwide and her works have been translated into 36 different languages. Keyes has won ‘Popular Fiction Book of the Year’ at the Irish Book Awards in 2009 and 2017 for This Charming man (2008) and The Break (2017) respectively. Keyes has had multiple best-selling books in the UK and Ireland, where her works routinely top bestsellers lists. 

Marian Keyes – Biography 
Penguin – Where to start reading Marian Keyes’ books 
The Guardian – Marian Keyes: rehab was one of the happiest times of my life 
Twitter – Marian Keyes  
BBC Radio 4 – Desert Island Discs Marian Keyes 
Independent.ie – Author of the Year 
Chatelaine – Keyes on the term chick lit 

Check out our Marian Keyes collection on our catalogue

“Writing about feeling disconnected has enabled me to connect, and that has been the most lovely thing of all.” ~ Marian Keyes

Books and Me: On my shelves with Jayne Mushore

Jayne Mushore, Project Support Officer at Hampshire Libraries, speaks with us about empowering reads, childhood joys and the complexities of international identities.

Click on any of the book images to reserve that title.

Where’s your favourite place to read?

I used to commute between Middlesbrough and London so a lot of my reading happened on the train, but I love listening to audiobooks in the car too – you can just put something on and drive, it’s a great way to pass the time. But for me, the best place to read is on holiday. Looking out across the sea without a care in the world, just getting completely lost in the book. I’m not rushing to get here or there I’m not rushing to do anything. There’s just that chilled vibe, knowing I don’t have to put the book down until I’m quite ready. I can just get lost in the pages.

How do you read?

I always read a fiction and non-fiction book at the same time. Sometimes the non-fiction becomes too much and I’ll need something more exciting and that’s when I’ll switch to the fiction book. With fiction, you have to conjure those images in your mind to picture how the scene would look and so I can’t read two fiction books at the same time. In an ideal world, I would love to start a book and finish it in one sit-in, but with work and home life, I really have to make time. So I take any chance I get to just sit down and read.

I love audiobooks and I use BorrowBox a lot. I would say my reading is about 50/50 between audiobooks and physical books. When someone is reading the book aloud to you, they will put the emphasis on parts that wouldn’t necessarily stand out to you. But when you read something yourself, you can pause on the parts that resonate with you personally. So while I love audiobooks I do really like to read a book myself when I can.

What are you reading at the moment?

I’m currently reading Slay In Your Lane by Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinene. It’s a non-fiction book of black British women telling the story of their experience stepping on the career ladder. It talks about the challenges that they faced and how they navigate the working world. For example, one of the women talks about how they created a lingerie line for women of colour, producing tights that work for different skin tones. If it isn’t something you think about it can seem small, and if you don’t have the option, it may not be something you think you need. But actually, being able to wear something that works with your body is great and it’s really important for somebody to have that option.

“The quest for good is a marathon and not a sprint; it is measured over years, not fleeting moments; over failures and missteps and, of course, successes.” – Slay In Your Lane

The other book I’m reading is Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor. I haven’t finished it yet but it’s quite out there and the cover really caught my eye. It’s about a girl who is communicating with spirits but is cursed by her community as her conception was from rape. It’s set in Africa and over the last year a lot of the novels I’ve been reading are Africa-based. I love reading about Africa in fiction, it’s always brought to life so differently each time, particularly in Who Fears Death. It’s quite different from any book I’ve read.

Reading patterns

I don’t really follow a genre or author in particular, I usually pick my books by going onto the library’s online catalogue to see what’s new and what catches my attention. Book covers really do grab me, they make me curious and tempt me to find out more. That may sound like a weird way to pick what you read but I always find something interesting by just having a browse. My friends and I always make recommendations to each other when we’ve read a really good book too. Slay In Your Lane was one that was a recommendation, I think it stood out because it’s such an empowering read for young black women.

I tend to read with my mood so if everything is going well, I will read quite uplifting books but if I’m going through something they’ll take a darker turn. Last year with the pandemic I was in the headspace of questioning a lot of things in my life and I couldn’t really be in “the now”. My friend recommended The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle and it really kept me going through lockdown.

First love, best loves

I’m from Zimbabwe so most of what I remember reading at a young age was in my native language. When I started learning English, I remember I used to read a lot of Roald Dahl and Enid Blyton’s The Secret Seven series. Fantastic Mr Fox is the book that really stands out from my childhood. A talking fox sneaking around being mischievous was hilarious to me. The world in the story was so different from our way of life in Africa I found it so intriguing. When I was a bit older one of my school friends had the Harry Potter books, I remember we read a few chapters of the prisoner of Azkaban and started asking ourselves “should we be doing this?”. With my African background and the Christian culture I grew up in, reading about witches wasn’t really acceptable. It shows how different attitudes can be as well because that was quite a big thing and we felt so wrong we didn’t end up finishing it!
The Devil Wears Prada was one of my favourites too, I remember being really excited to get a hold of the second book when it came out. The Hunger Games series was another big favourite of mine as well, but I remember reading a lot of John Grisham novels too. He was a lawyer before he became a writer, and The Firm is one I really remember enjoying.

The series of books I used to really love was The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency – I used to read the books over and over again, I think I know them by heart! Reading about this strong African woman who’s doing exciting things was really thrilling. They hold real sentimental value to me, I remember thinking “I want to be that woman who’s out there getting stuff done!”

A book I really connected with recently was We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo. Bulawayo is from Zimbabwe too and reading the book brought back so many memories. In the book, she writes about being playing ‘countries’ outside as children like I used to growing up. I can really understand the perspective she writes from. The main character, Darling, witnesses the violence happening in Zimbabwe as she’s growing up and doesn’t really understand what’s going on and then she moves to America. Something that made me quite emotional when I was reading the book is when she’s in America and calls a friend back home. The friend says that Darling can’t say ‘our country’ when talking about Zimbabwe because she decided to leave. I can relate to that because the friends and all the things you used to hold dear that built your friendship are no longer there. You don’t belong in Zimbabwe anymore, but you don’t feel as if you belong in this new world yet either. You’re in limbo. You’re very grateful for the opportunities you’ve found in this new world but trying to fit in parts of your old life with it is really hard. Then when you try to connect with the people back at home to say, “I’m one of you still”, they reject you and so you don’t know where you stand. It was very bittersweet to read about that through the story of Darling in We Need New Names. Everyone I know who has read the book and has migrated has agreed that this book perfectly tells the story of how it feels.

Overlooked Delights

Maya Angelou’s Letter to My Daughter was extremely endearing and touching to me. I think the message of teaching a girl-child to be independent and themselves. That message of keeping going and finding your strength really resonated with my upbringing and some of what I witnessed as part of my cultural background. Reading a book like this, where somebody is really holding out their heart and saying, “things happen and life is hard but you do need to keep moving because there is light at the end of the tunnel”, is just so powerful to me.

“You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.” – Letter to My Daughter

Jayne Mushore is the Project Support Officer for the digital initiatives of Hampshire Libraries, working to deliver services such as the publicly accessible computers and the procurement of audiobooks. Jayne was speaking with Isaac Fravashi.

Author of the Month: Ian McEwan

Ian McEwan’s novels are as diverse as his upbringing. Born in Hampshire in 1948, his childhood was a transient one, spent moving between east Asia, Germany and north Africa, following his father’s military postings. His similarly wide-roaming career has positioned him as one of Britain’s foremost literary voices. 

Whether penning eerie psychodramas or delicately wrought period pieces, what unites McEwan’s novels is an unerring curiosity about people. Whether the book’s key concern is personal or political, it is the intimate interpersonal relationships that provide their emotional core.  

McEwan’s career began with a penchant for the gothic. His first two novels The Cement Garden (1978) and The Comfort of Strangers (1981) were released to uneasy admiration, with critic John Krewson describing the former as being “beautiful but disturbing”. Subsequent works went on to stray from this generic darkness and, in doing so, found a wider readership. After the divisive release of The Child In Time (1987), an unusual tale of time travel, cold-war era romance The Innocent (1990) was met with near-unanimous critical praise. 

The image shows the book cover of The Cement Garden by Ian McEwan
The image shows the book cover of The Child in Time by Ian McEwan

 

It was his 1998 novel, Amsterdam, that marked a true popular breakthrough. The tale of love and death won him the Booker Prize, with critics praising its “sardonic and wise examination of the morals and culture of our time.” 

A popular candidate for adaptation, McEwan’s works have frequently been seen on screen. Joe Wright’s 2007 film Atonement, adapted from McEwan’s 2001 novel of the same name brings to life a confusion of sexuality, war and guilt, replicating the author’s ability to vividly capture a moment frozen in time and imbue it with sizzling heat.  

More recently, Man-Booker prize shortlisted On Chesil Beach (2007) was adapted into a 2017 film starring Saoirse Ronan. Once again McEwan’s meditations on desire in a repressive society of the past are proven to have a continuing contemporary appeal. This reliable appetite to see McEwan’s work reinvented speaks to his continued appeal to diverse audiences.  

With the ability to wheedle his way to the emotional heart of any story, regardless of how convoluted, McEwan brings his readers into an unfamiliar situation only to find relatable humanity. 

The image shows the book cover of On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan
The image shows the book cover of Atonement by Ian McEwan

These titles are also available to loan through our eBooks app, BorrowBox.

Written by Flora Pick

Joanne Harris

If you think you’re familiar with Joanne Harris, our author-of-the-month for July, you might want to think again.

While she’s best known for her multimillion-seller Chocolat, Harris’ books don’t tend to neatly fit within one genre. Perhaps uniquely among best-selling authors, her books dip into a multiplicity of topics such as food, romance, France, psychological thrillers, vampires, Norse mythology, fairy tales, author self-help – and Dr Who.

In a recent interview with the Hampshire Libraries’ podcast Love Your Library (available later this month), Harris explained: ‘Much as a I understand the convenience and the financial interest of being a brand who does the same thing predictably every year, I just couldn’t do that. What drives me is an element of discovery and of risk.’

It’s the above-mentioned Chocolat (made into an Oscar-nominated film featuring Juliette Binoche and Johnny Depp), which first gave her a taste of success. It’s now sold more than 33 million copies worldwide and in 2012 she became only the fifth British female novelist to join the book industry’s “Millionaires Club”: an exclusive list of authors who have seen at least one of their books pass the million sales barrier in the UK since the 1990s.

Joanne Harris (MBE) grew up with her English father and French mother in Barnsley, South Yorkshire and started her career as a teacher, pursuing writing as a hobby. Her first novel, The Evil Seed, is a dark gothic romance which had limited commercial success. She spent more than 12 years teaching French at Leeds Grammar School, the inspiration behind her St Oswald’s series of books, the latest of which, A Narrow Door, is to be published next month. This darkly comic novel continues the story of eccentric Latin Master Roy Straitley, and follows Gentlemen and Players, and Different Class.

She said: ‘In a sense I’ve been writing about teaching since the start. I tend to write about small communities and the pressures they undergo, and the changes new arrivals make – and how the volatile chemistry of the small community can be utterly disrupted by what seems to be a relatively trivial change.’

Harris writes intelligently with a dry humour, and while her work is sometimes described as captivating or enchanting, her novels can frequently be darkly funny. Settings play an important role in her books and she often writes in a first-person, dual-narrator structure with complex characters who may be psychologically damaged or morally ambivalent.

She’s already published two other books in 2021: The Strawberry Thief (the fourth in the Chocolat series, including Chocolat, The Lollipop Shoes and Peaches for Monsieur le Curé), a bittersweet story of motherhood and learning to be yourself; and Honeycomb, a novel built from stories in which every chapter tells a standalone tale, which sits within her folklore/fairytale collection (A Pocketful of Crows, Orfeia and The Blue Salt Road).

This achievement is all the more admirable since, alongside the normal difficulties of living through lockdowns and Coronavirus, Harris was diagnosed with breast cancer at the end of last year. With typical generosity, she has decided to share her experience to ‘make it more mundane’ and talks about her diagnosis as ‘Mr C’, a fictional character who has outstayed his welcome: her Twitter updates include the hashtag #GoodbyeMrC.

Harris still lives in Yorkshire, she plays bass and flute in a band first formed with her husband when she was sixteen, and works in a shed in her garden.

If you like Joanne Harris, you might also like Tracy Chevalier, Louis De Bernieres, Helen Fielding, Sebastian Faulks, Kate Atkinson, Salley Vickers, William Boyd, Anne Tyler, Barbara Kingsolver and Edward St Aubyn.

Written by Kate.

Black History Month 2019

October is Black History Month, an awareness month and a nationwide celebration of black history, arts and culture throughout Britain. The events, articles, study and remembrance throughout the country make October worth celebrating each year.

As well as applauding achievements and success over the decades, the month also provides a vital reflection on the challenges that remain. In this way the month plays a vital role in raising awareness of British social history and the continued importance of identity, social equality and integration

Black History Month is essential in promoting learning, providing information and contributing to community cohesion. For the past 30+ years it has shone, and continues to shine, a beacon of light on the facts about Black history, heritage, legacy and the on-going struggles for equality and justice.  More than that, it educates, informs and inspires many to be proud of who they are and to understand history, origins and the right to exist as equals.

This year, to celebrate Black History Month, we’ll be looking at some of the incredible black British authors who are, or have, contributed to the wonderful world of books and the literary culture.
There are so many talented black authors it’s hard to choose one, which is why in this blog we’ll be shining a light at 20 of these incredible authors – all of whom have books you can borrow from Hampshire Libraries.
To browse their books, click or tap the author’s name for a full list of the books available to borrow.

Never be limited by other people’s limited imaginations.

Dr. Mae Jemison, first African-American female astronaut

Ade Adepitan

© Every Parent & Child Charity


Ade Adepitan is a British television presenter, wheelchair basketball player and now children’s author, he was awarded an MBE for services to disability sport in 2005.
His first book was published in 2018.

John Agard

© British Council Literature



Afro-Guyanese playwright, poet and children’s writer, John Agard, was born in Guyana in 1949 – 17 years before Guyana became independent.

Atinuke

© The Hay Festival


Beloved children’s author Atinuke, spent her childhood in both England and Nigeria. She’s most known for the ‘Anna Hibiscus’ – and ‘The no. 1 car spotter’ -series.

Yaba Badoe

© International Film Festival


Yaba Badoe is a Ghanaian-British documentary filmmaker, journalist and author, who writes fictional books aimed at teens and young adults.
Her first novel, True Murder was published in 2009.

Floella Benjamin

© Carrie Kleiner

Floella Benjamin was awarded an OBE in 2001 for services to broadcasting, and in 2010 she was awarded the title ‘Baroness’.
She’s written over 20 books for both adults and children, her most recent book ‘Sea of Tears’ was published in 2012.

Humour breaks down boundaries, it topples our self-importance, it connects people, and because it engages and entertains, it ultimately enlightens.

John Agard, Half Caste and Other Poems

Malorie Blackman

©malorueblackman.co.uk


Malorie Blackman is a children’s author who’s written over 50 books for childrens, teens and young adults. She was awarded an OBE in 2008, and held the position of Children’s Laureate from 2013 to 2015.

Valerie Bloom

© valeriebloom.co.uk

Valerie Bloom is a children’s writer and poet, she received an MBE in 2008. She was born in Jamaica in 1956, she was six years old when Jamaica attained full independence from the United Kingdom.
Her most recent poetry collection, Jaws and claws and things with wings was published in 2013.

Joseph Coelho

© Reading Agency

Joseph Coelho is from Roehampton, just outside London. He’s an author, performance poet and playwright. Starting May this year, he’s on a Library Marathon, the aim of which is to join a library in every region of the UK.
His latest book A Year of Nature Poems, was published earlier this year and contains 12
poems – one for each month of the year.

Diana Evans

© The Guardian


Diana Evans is an author, journalist and critic. Her latest book Ordinary People was shortlisted for the Women’s Prize For Fiction award.
Her first novel was published in 2005, and she’s since written another three books for adults.

Bernardine Evaristo

© British Council Literature


Bernardine Evaristo holds an MBE, a FRSL, a FRSA and a FEA, she’s the author of eight novels. Her latest novel Girl, Woman, Other is currently shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and for the Gordon Burn Prize.

Sometimes the things you’re convinced you don’t want turn out to be the thing you need the most in this world.

Malorie Blackman, Boys Don’t Cry

Aminatta Forna

© LiBeraturpreis

Aminatta Forna is a Scottish-Sierra Leonean author of four novels, one memoir and one anthology.
She was awarded an OBE in 2017 for services to literature, and have been awarded a number of awards and honours.

Patrice Lawrence

© Twitter


Born in Brighton, Patrice Lawrence writes books for both adults and children. Her 2016 novel, Orangeboy, won the ‘Waterstones Children’s Book Prize for Older Children’.

Andrea Levy

© BBC

Andrea Levy was born in London 1956, she’s most known for her two novels Small Island and The Long Song. Her books explore topics related to British Jamaicans and how they negotiate racial, cultural and national identities.
Andrea Levy sadly passed away 14 February 2019.

Dreda Say Mitchell

© Capital Crime Writing Festival


Dreda Say Mitchell is a crime author, broadcaster, journalist and freelance education consultant, born in London in 1965.
In 2005, she was the first black British author to win the The John Creasey Dagger.

Nadifa Mohamed

© Twitter

Nadifa Mohamed is a Somali-British novelist, currently living in London. Her debut novel, Black Mamba Boy, was both longlisted and shortlisted for a number of awards when it first came out.
In 2013, she featured on Granta magazine’s ‘Best of Young British Novelists’ list.

Laugh as much as you breathe and love as long as you live.

Andrea Levy, The Long Song

Ignatius Sancho

© Thomas Gainsborough, 1768, National Gallery of Canada


Charles Ignatius Sancho was a British composer, actor, and writer. He is the only black Briton known to have voted in the 18th century for members of parliament in Westminster.
A collection of his letters was published two years after his death in 1782.

Zadie Smith

© British Council Literature


Zadie Smith is an award winning author from
London, her debut novel White Teeth became a best-seller and won a number of awards. Four of her books have been shortlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction, one of which, On Beauty won in 2006.

Ben Bailey Smith

© The Times


Ben Bailey Smith is an English rapper, comedian, actor, screenwriter, radio presenter and voice-over artist, also known by his stage name Doc Brown. He’s written two picture books, both of which can be found in Hampshire Libraries.

Alex Wheatle

© Brixton Blog


Alex Wheatle is an author of books for young adults and adults. He received the London Arts Board New Writers Award in 1999 for his debut novel Brixton Rock.
In 2008 he was awarded an MBE for services to literature

Benjamin Zephaniah

© The Guardian


Born in 1958, Benjamin Zephaniah is a writer, dub poet and playwright. He’s most known for his poetry and teen fiction novels. In 2008 he was included in The Times list of Britain’s top 50 post-war writers.

Every moment happens twice: inside and outside, and they are two different histories.

Zadie Smith, White Teeth

Love Your Library – the Hampshire Library podcast

Are you an avid reader?  Keen to be inspired for your next book?  You’ll love our new podcast series which is free to download and subscribe.  You’ll find two episodes to download straightaway which feature interviews with Shetland and Vera author Ann Cleeves and AGA-saga queen Joanna Trollope.  You’ll also hear book recommendations from our library staff at Chandlers Ford and Fareham. Our hosts Kate and Mary are both keen book lovers who’ve worked for Hampshire County Council for more years than they’d care to admit. 

Here’s links to the books discussed in each episode:

Island Life
In this episode, our hosts Kate Price McCarthy and Mary Stone talk to Ann Cleeves about her latest and, can we bear it, last Shetland book, Wild Fire.  Ann also gives us the lowdown on her upcoming book The Long Call, the first in her new Two Rivers series. 

They discussed three very different books with Chandlers Ford Library:
The Key to Flambards by Linda Newbery
The One by John Marrs  
The Summer Book  by Tove Jansson

Other books mentioned include:
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin by Louis de Bernieres
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell

Match Fit
In this episode, our hosts Kate Price McCarthy and Mary Stone talk to Joanna Trollope about her latest and twenty-first book, An Unsuitable Match, which vividly depicts the family tensions and dilemmas caused by love in later life. Joanna also talks about her updated version of Sense and Sensibility published as part of the Austen Project in 2013.

They discussed three recommended books with the library team at Fareham Library:
Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple
Normal People by Sally Rooney
Never Greener by Ruth Jones

Other books mentioned include:
The Warden by Anthony Trollope
Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope
Northanger Abbey by Val McDermid
Emma by Alexander McCall Smith
Death Comes to Pemberley by PD James
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Emma by Jane Austen
Lady Susan by Jane Austen
Persuasion by Jane Austen

Do let us know if you’ve read and enjoyed any of the books we’ve talked about. 

The Taste of Sorrow by Jude Morgan

About the book

Charlotte. Emily. Anne. The Brontë sisters – the drama, the passion, and a story that lives for ever…

Once upon a time there were three sisters, bound by love and suffering, growing up in wild isolation in a lonely house on the moor. Their story will astonish you: their passionate, dangerous closeness; their struggle against the world; their determination to rise above the fates of their parents and their other lost sisters, to become more than the world ever thought they could be. You don’t know their story, but you think they do. They were the Brontës.

Reviewed by Alton U3A

“The style was difficult but the content was absorbing and we all wanted to get to the end”

star rating ****

Read this book

Request to borrow a reading book set

http://www3.hants.gov.uk/borrow-book-sets.htm

Wild Mary by Patrick Marnham

About the book

Mary Wesley published her first novel at seventy and went on to write a further nine bestsellers, including the legendary The Camomile Lawn, in a style best described as arsenic without the old lace. Many of her stories were inspired by her experiences during the Blitz, and by her marriages: the first to an aristocrat, a brief and conventional affair, and the second to a penniless writer she adored. A remarkable book about a remarkable woman, Patrick Marnham’s brilliantly researched and wonderfully impartial book disentangles truth from rumour, highlighting the links between Wesley’s real life and her fiction.

 

Reviewed by Itchen

“This biography about the author Mary Wesley was enjoyed by most of the group. Everyone had a different opinion as to how she lived her life and how well it was written. An excellent book for a group to discuss

star rating *** ½

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