UK Disability History Month 2020

“We need to make every single thing accessible
to every single disabled person.”

Stevie Wonder

UK Disability History Month (UKDHM) has been an annual event since 2010, creating a platform to focus on the history of disabled peoples’ struggle for equality and human rights. For this, the eleventh UK Disability History Month (UKDHM), the focus is on Access and asking ‘How far have we come? How far have we to go?’

Disability was historically seen as a tragedy that happens because of genes, disease, accident, or war, with the assumption that the disabled need to be rehabilitated to overcome the impairment of our body or mind.

Having an impairment can sometimes be painful, life shortening and disempowering, but having to deal with prejudicial barriers, based on negative attitudes from the past, is discrimination that denies the human rights of the disabled. Led by disabled colleagues, we have created list of books which we hope will change this narrative and help reframe perceptions of disability.

These are just some of the incredible books you can find through the BorrowBox app as eBooks and eAudiobooks, and as physical books on our library shelves.
For our eBooks and eAudiobooks, simply log in and browse the special featured bookshelf on BorrowBox to see the amazing eTitles available. For physical copies, browse our online catalogue and, for a small charge, reserve the book or books you would like to pick up at your local library. Or tell staff at the library if you would like these kind of books as part of your Ready Read collection.


Diversify
by June Sarpong

Putting the spotlight on groups who are often marginalised in our society, including women, ethnic minorities, those living with disabilities, and the LGBTQ+ community, Diversify uncovers the hidden cost of exclusion and shows how a new approach to how we learn, live and do business can solve some of the most stubborn challenges we face.

Available as eBook, eAudio and physical book

Disability Visibility
by Alice Wong

A ground-breaking collection of writing on the joys and challenges of the modern disability experience: Disability Visibility brings together the voices of activists, authors, lawyers, politicians, artists, and everyday people whose daily lives are, in the words of playwright Neil Marcus, “an art . . . an ingenious way to live.”
Taken together, this anthology gives a glimpse of the vast richness and complexity of the disabled experience, highlighting the passions, talents, and everyday lives of this community. It invites readers to question their own assumptions and understandings.

Available as eAudio and physical book

Disfigured: On Fairy Tales, Disability, and Making Space
by Amanda Leduc

This book challenges the ableism of fairy tales and offers new ways to celebrate the magic of all bodies. By examining the ways that fairy tales have shaped our expectations of disability, Disfigured will point the way toward a new world where disability is no longer a punishment or impediment but operates, instead, as a way of centering a protagonist and helping them to cement their own place in a story, and from there, the world.

Available as eBook

Sitting Pretty: The View from My Ordinary Resilient Disabled Body
by Rebekah Taussig

A memoir-in-essays from disability advocate and creator of the Instagram account @sitting_pretty Rebekah Taussig, processing a lifetime of memories to paint a beautiful, nuanced portrait of a body that looks and moves differently than most. Rebekah reflects on everything from the complications of kindness and charity, living both independently and dependently, experiencing intimacy, and how the pervasiveness of ableism in our everyday media directly translates to everyday life. Sitting Pretty challenges us as a society to be patient and vigilant, practical, and imaginative, kind and relentless, as we set to work to write an entirely different story.

Available as eBook, eAudiobook and physical book

Unconquerable: the Invictus spirit
by Boris Starling

Invictus Games change lives and save lives. Created and spearheaded by Prince Harry, for whom this is a very personal cause, the Games are for current and former servicemen and women who have been wounded, injured or sick. Most races are about who gets to the finish line first. At the Invictus Games, even making the start line is an achievement beyond measure. Unconquerable: The Invictus Spirit represents the spirit of the Games, upholding a message of self-determination, positivity and sacrifice.

Available as eBook and physical book

Windrush Day 2020

Following losses in World War II, Britain was in need of labourers, this prompted a campaign to encourage people from other countries in the British Empire and Commonwealth to immigrate to the UK. On 22 June 1948, the first ship carrying immigrants from the Caribbean arrived. This first ship’s name, HMT Empire Windrush , inspired the generation of imigrants to be called ‘The Windrush Generation’.

70+ years later, and 22 June is #WindrushDay in honour of all those who left their homes and, for many, their families to start a new life and help rebuild Britain. It’s a day to celebrate the rich, mixed history that this country has and embrace the wonderful stories, culture and food that has come to shape Britain.
We’ve put together some recommendation for books that’s perfect to read to gain a better understanding of Windrush and the Windrush Generation.


Windrush: a ship through time
by Paul Arnott

Available as physical book

For three decades the Windrush was the maritime Zelig of the twentieth century, playing different roles in the most turbulent years in modern times. Designed in 1930 in the Hamburg boatyard of a Jewish shipbuilder to ferry Germans to a new life in South America, it wasn’t long before Goebbels requisitioned her as one of his ‘Strength Through Joy’ vessels. However, her duties soon darkened: she became a Nazi troop carrier, a support vessel for the pocket battleship Tirpitz and a prison ship transporting Jews to Auschwitz. This is Paul Arnott’s vivid biography of a unique vessel, combining the memories of people who were there with a gripping account of an extraordinary merchant ship at the end of empires.

Surge
by Jay Bernard

Available as eBook and eAudiobook

Dubbed the ‘New Cross Massacre’, the fire was initially believed to be a racist attack, and the indifference with which the tragedy was met by the state triggered a new era of race relations in Britain.Tracing a line from New Cross to the ‘towers of blood’ of the Grenfell fire, this urgent collection speaks with, in and of the voices of the past, brought back by the incantation of dancehall rhythms and the music of Jamaican patois, to form a living presence in the absence of justice. A ground-breaking work of excavation, memory and activism – both political and personal, witness and documentary – Surge shines a much-needed light on an unacknowledged chapter in British history, one that powerfully resonates in our present moment.

Mother Country: real stories of the Windrush children 
edited by Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff

Available as physical book

Britain was known as the Mother Country: a home away from home; a place that you would be welcomed with open arms; a land where you were free to build a new life. 70 years on, this remarkable book explores the reality of the Windrush experience. It is an honest, eye-opening, funny, moving and ultimately inspiring celebration of the lives of both ordinary and extraordinary people.

The Windrush Betrayal
by Amelia Gentleman

Available as physical book and coming soon as eBook

Paulette Wilson had always assumed she was British. She had spent most of her life in London working as a cook; she even worked in the House of Commons’ canteen. How could someone who had lived in England since being a primary school pupil suddenly be classified as an illegal immigrant? It was only through Amelia Gentleman’s tenacious investigative and campaigning journalism that it emerged that thousands were in Paulette’s position. What united them was that they had all arrived in the UK from the Commonwealth as children in the 1950s and 1960s. In ‘The Windrush Betrayal’, Gentleman tells the story of the scandal and exposes deeply disturbing truths about modern Britain.

Home Coming
by Colin Grant

Available as eBook, eAudiobook and physical book

When Colin Grant was growing up in Luton in the 1960s, he learned not to ask his Jamaican parents why they had emigrated to Britain. ‘We’re here because we’re here’, his father would say, ‘You have some place else to go?’. But now, seventy years after the arrival of ships such as the Windrush, this generation of pioneers are ready to tell their stories. ‘Homecoming’ draws on over a hundred first-hand interviews, archival recordings and memoirs by the women and men who came to Britain from the West Indies between the late 1940s and the early 1960s.

Familiar Stranger
by Stuart Hall with Bill Schwarz

Available as physical book

Stuart Hall grew up in a middle-class family in 1930s Jamaica, still then a British colony. He found himself caught between two worlds: the stiflingly respectable middle class in Kingston, who, in their habits and ambitions, measured themselves against the white planter elite; and working-class and peasant Jamaica, neglected and grindingly poor, though rich in culture, music and history. But as colonial rule was challenged, things began to change in Kingston and across the world. When, in 1951, a scholarship took him across the Atlantic to Oxford University, Hall encountered other Caribbean writers and thinkers, from Sam Selvon and George Lamming to V.S. Naipaul. He also forged friendships with the likes of Raymond Williams and E.P. Thompson, with whom he worked in the formidable political movement, the New Left.

Voices of the Windrush generation: the real story told by the people themselves 
by David Matthews

Available as eBook and Physical book

With over 20 first-hand accounts from men, women and children of Windrush, this work sheds light on the true impact of one of the most disastrous and damaging scandals in recent memory, and gives a platform to those most affected – those whose voices have yet to be truly heard. Their stories provide intimate, personal and moving perspective on what it means to be black in Britain today, and the heartache the ‘hostile environment policy’ our government has created has meant for those who have called this country home for half a century and more.

Lovers and Strangers
by Clair Wills

Available as physical book

The battered and exhausted Britain of 1945 was desperate for workers – to rebuild, to fill the factories, to make the new NHS work. From all over the world and with many motives, thousands of individuals took the plunge. Most assumed they would spend just three or four years here, sending most of their pay back home, but instead large numbers stayed – and transformed the country. Drawing on an amazing array of unusual and surprising sources, Clair Wills’ book brings to life the incredible diversity and strangeness of the migrant experience.


For more articles and Windrush stories, visit the British Library’s website.

Holocaust Memorial Day 2020

      “Holocaust Memorial Day is the day for everyone to remember the millions of people murdered in the Holocaust, under Nazi Persecution, and in the genocides which followed in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia, and Darfur.”

Holocaust Memorial Day Trust

On Holocaust Memorial Day, we remember the six million Jewish men, women and children murdered in the Holocaust, and the millions of people killed under Nazi Persecution, and in the genocides which followed in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia, and Darfur.

2020 marks 75 years the end of the Holocaust and the Nazi Persecution, it also marks 45 years since the genocide in Cambodia began and 25 years since the genocide in Bosnia.
This day is for remembrance and reflection on the horrors that the human race have allowed to happen, and remember all those who lost their lives.

Those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it.

George Santayana

Many books, both fictional and non-fictional, have been written on and about the Holocaust and genocide. If you would like to learn more, we’ve put together four booklists with titles that we think are worth reading.

For children and teens:

Fictional stories
Non-fiction titles

For adults:

Fiction books
Non-Fiction books

Holocaust Memorial Day: Talk and Music Recital
Wednesday 29 January, 7.30pm 
Winchester Discovery Centre
Tickets £3

Danny Habel presents ‘My Family Blown Apart’, a biographical talk on the experiences of his own family during the Holocaust. Students from Peter Symonds College also provide music for reflection. Holocaust Memorial Day 2020’s theme is ‘Stand Together’, exploring how prejudiced regimes have been challenged by people uniting. 

What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.

Anne Frank

International Day of Persons with Disabilities

3 December 2019

The UN celebrate this day every year on 3 December and the theme for this year is ‘Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership‘. Their aim is to ensure that all are treated equally and to make the world a more inclusive place.

Libraries have many different ways of being inclusive to all, some of those being dyslexia friendly books, large print, audiobooks and braille books.

Booktrust have created a list of books to read with your children and these are some of the few that we have on our library catalogue:

Song for a whale / Lynne Kelly.

Iris was born deaf, but she’s never let that define her; after all, it’s the only life she’s ever known. And until recently she wasn’t even very lonely, because her grandparents are both deaf, too. But Grandpa has just died and Grandma’s not the same without him. The only place Iris really feels at home anymore is in her electronics workshop where she loves taking apart antique radios. Then, during a science lesson about sound waves, Iris finds out about a whale who is unable to communicate with other whales. The lonely whale awakens something in Iris. She’s determined to show him that someone in the world knows he’s there.

Lightning chase me home / Amber Lee Dodd.

Amelia McLeod lives on a tiny Scottish island, her mum has walked out on her and she’s about to start at a whole new, scary school. Her dyslexia means she’s a target for the school bullies. When she makes a wish on her birthday to be reunited with her mum, she finds herself quite literally disappearing at times of stress and reappearing elsewhere on the island, where she finds clues and snapshots of her parents’ past.

Amazing / Steve Antony.

A little boy and his pet dragon are the very best of friends. They laugh, they sing, they dance, they snooze. They are both amazing – just like everyone else! A celebration of friendship and being yourself with a positive message about celebrating diversity.

Me and my sister / Rose Robbins.

This appealing brother and sister duo spend a lot of their day together, eating meals, going to school and playing. But life with an autistic sibling is not always easy. Through the eyes of the brother, we find out how they are both very different, but also very similar in other ways, and come what may they have lots of fun together and love each other just the same. This is a touching book that will strike a chord with every family with siblings, especially where one is differently abled.

Can you see me? : expected to fit in, proud to stand out / Libby Scott & Rebecca Westcott.

People think that because Tally’s autistic, she doesn’t realise what they’re thinking, but Tally sees and hears – and notices – all of it. Endearing, insightful and warmly uplifting, this is a story of autism, empathy and kindness that will touch readers of all ages.

Holocaust Memorial Day – Adult non-fiction booklist


The choice
by Edith Eger

In 1944, 16-year-old Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz. There she endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. Over the coming months, Edith’s bravery helped her sister to survive, and led to her bunkmates rescuing her during a death march. When their camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive. In ‘The Choice’, Dr Edith Eger shares her experience of the Holocaust and the remarkable stories of those she has helped ever since.


The volunteer: one man, and underground army, and the secret mission to destroy Auschwitz
by Jack Fairweather

This is untold story of one of the greatest heroes of the Second World War. In the Summer of 1940, after the Nazi occupation of Poland, an underground operative called Witold Pilecki accepted a mission to uncover the fate of thousands of people being interred at a new concentration camp on the border of the Reich. His mission was to report on Nazi crimes and raise a secret army to stage an uprising. The name of the detention centre – Auschwitz. It was only after arriving at the camp that he started to discover the Nazi’s terrifying designs. Over the next two and half years, Witold forged an underground army that smuggled evidence of Nazi atrocities to the West, culminating in the mass murder of over a million Jews.


Women’s experiences in the Holocaust: in their own words
by Agnes Grunwald-Spier

This title brings to light women’s experiences in the Holocaust. It explains why women’s difficulties were different to those of men. Men were taken away and the women were left to cope with children and elderly relatives and obliged to take on new roles. Women like Andrew Sachs’ mother had to deal with organising departure for a foreign country and making choices about what to take and what to abandon. The often desperate hunt for food for themselves and those in their care more often than not fell to the women, as did medical issues. They had to face pregnancies, abortions and, in some camps, medical experiments. Many women wrote diaries, memoirs, letters and books about their experiences and these have been used extensively here.


But you did not come back
by Marceline Loridan-Ivens with Judith Perrignon

Marceline Loridan-Ivens was just 15 when she and her father were arrested and sent to concentration camps. He prepared her for the worst, telling her that he would not return. The three kilometres between her father in Auschwitz and herself in Birkenau were an insurmountable distance, and yet he managed to send her a small note via an electrician in the camp – a sign of life. Here, Marceline writes a letter to the father she would never know as an adult, and the man whose death enveloped her whole life. Her testimony is a haunting and challenging reminder of one of the worst crimes humanity has ever seen, and an affecting personal story of a woman whose life was shattered and never totally rebuilt.


The Holocaust: a new history
by Laurence Rees

This text answers two fundamental questions about the Holocaust. How, and why, did it happen? Laurence Rees’s answer, based on the latest academic research and 25 years of exploring the subject, reveals three themes. First, it was not just about the Jews – the Nazis would have murdered many more non-Jews – and it was not just about Germans. Second, there was no single ‘decision’ to start the Holocaust – there was a series of escalations, most often when the Nazi leadership interacted with their fanatical grassroots supporters. Third, it took longer than we might think for the world to recognise the importance of what happened – only in the mid-1970s did the word ‘Holocaust’ enter the popular consciousness. Through a chronological narrative, featuring the latest historical research and compelling eyewitness testimony, this is the story of the worst crime in history.


The boy who said nothing: a child’s story of fleeing conflict
by Mirsad Solaković with Cass Pennant

Mirsad Solaković survived a war in which some 300,000 people died, but was left with psychological damage. Mirsad lived through the ethnic cleansing of Bosnian civilians, until his family escaped to the UK. Following his experiences, he became difficult and untractable, and refused to speak English – until dedicated and sympathetic teachers at his school in Birmingham brought him back into contact with those around him. This thought-provoking account of the Bosnian and Herzegovinian tragedy paints a uniquely intimate portrait of survival, revealing pain that has never faded, yet has not crushed the human spirit. It is also an uplifting account of just how effective good teachers can be when faced with deeply troubled pupils.


Renia’s diary: a young girl’s life in the shadow of the Holocaust
by Renia Spiegel

Renia is a young girl who dreams of becoming a poet. But Renia is Jewish, she lives in Poland and the year is 1939. When Russia and Germany invade her country, Renia’s world shatters. Separated from her mother, her life takes on a new urgency as she flees Przemysl to escape night bombing raids, observes the disappearances of other Jewish families and, finally, witnesses the creation of the ghetto. But alongside the terror of war, there is also great beauty, as she begins to find her voice as a writer and falls in love for the first time. She and the boy she falls in love with, Zygmunt, share their first kiss a few hours before the Nazis reach her hometown. And it is Zygmunt who writes the final, heartbreaking entry in Renia’s diary. Recently rediscovered after seventy years, ‘Renia’s Diary’ is already being described as a classic of Holocaust literature.


Holocaust Memorial Day – Adult Fiction booklist


Mr. Sammler’s planet
by Saul Bellow

Winner of the 1976 Nobel Prize for Literature, Saul Bellow’s novel examines the life of Artur Sammler, a Holocaust survivor. A contemporary work, it looks at the events of the past and their effect on both the present and the future.


Small country
by Gaël Faye

Burundi, 1992. For ten-year-old Gabriel, life in his comfortable expat neighbourhood of Bujumbura with his French father, Rwandan mother and little sister, Ana, is something close to paradise. These are happy, carefree days spent with his friends sneaking cigarettes and stealing mangoes, swimming in the river and riding bikes in the streets they have turned into their kingdom. But dark clouds are gathering over this small country, and soon their peaceful idyll will shatter when Burundi and neighbouring Rwanda are brutally hit by war and genocide.


The librarian of Auschwitz
by Antonio Iturbe

Fourteen-year-old Dita is one of the many imprisoned by the Nazis at Auschwitz. Taken, along with her mother and father, from the Terezín ghetto in Prague, Dita is adjusting to the constant terror that is life in the camp. When Jewish leader Freddy Hirsch asks Dita to take charge of the eight precious volumes the prisoners have managed to smuggle past the guards, she agrees. And so Dita becomes the secret librarian of Auschwitz, responsible for the safekeeping of the small collection of titles, as well as the ‘living books’ – prisoners of Auschwitz who know certain books so well, they too can be ‘borrowed’ to educate the children in the camp. But books are extremely dangerous. They make people think. And nowhere are they more dangerous than in Block 31 of Auschwitz, the children’s block, where the slightest transgression can result in execution, no matter how young the transgressor.


The tattooist of Auschwitz
by Heather Morris

This novel is based on the true story of Lale and Gita Sokolov, two Slovakian Jews, who survived Auschwitz and eventually made their home in Australia. In that terrible place, Lale was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival – literally scratching numbers into his fellow victims’ arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust.


Address unknown
by Kathrine Kressmann Taylor

This story was written on the eve of the Holocaust as a series of letters between an American Jew living in San Francisco and his former business partner and friend who returned to his native Germany.


The people we were before
by Annabelle Thorpe

Yugoslavia, summer 1979. A new village. A new life. But eight-year-old Miro knows the real reason why his family moved from the inland city of Knin to the sunkissed village of Ljeta on the Dalmatian Coast, a tragedy he tries desperately to forget. The Ljeta years are happy ones, though, and when he marries his childhood sweetheart, and they have a baby daughter, it seems as though life is perfect. However, storm clouds are gathering above Yugoslavia. War breaks out, and one split-second decision destroys the life Miro has managed to build. Driven by anger and grief, he flees to Dubrovnik, plunging himself into the hard-bitten world of international war reporters. There begins a journey that will take him ever deeper into danger: from Dubrovnik, to Sarajevo, to the worst atrocities of war-torn Bosnia, Miro realises that even if he survives, there can be no way back to his earlier life.


The book thief
by Markus Zusak

Narrated in the all-knowing matter-of-fact voice of Death, witnessing the story of the citizens of Molching. By 1943, the Allied bombs are falling, and the sirens begin to wail. Liesel shares out her books in the air-raid shelters. But one day, the wail of the sirens comes too late.


Holocaust Memorial Day – Children’s information booklist

Parents can only give good advice or put them
on the right paths, but the final forming of
a person’s character lies in their own hands.

Anne Frank

Hedy’s journey: the true story of a Hungarian girl fleeing the Holocaust 
by Michelle Bisson and illustrated by El Primo Ramón

It is 1941. Hedy and her family are Jewish, and the Jew-hating Nazi Party is rising. Hedy’s family is no longer safe in their home in Hungary. They decide to flee to America, but because of their circumstances, 16-year-old Hedy must make her way through Europe alone. Will luck be with her? Will she be brave? Join Hedy on her journey – where she encounters good fortune and misfortune, a kind helper and cruel soldiers, a reunion and a tragedy – and discover how Hedy is both lucky and brave.


The diary of a young girl
by Anne Frank

Sensitively edited, the abridged edition of ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’ gives younger readers their first introduction to the extraordinary diary of an ordinary girl who has long become a household name. There are line drawings, lots of family photographs, and an afterword to explain why the diary ends so abruptly.


Witnesses to war: eight true-life stories of Nazi persecution
by Michael Leapman

The experiences of eight children from different parts of occupied Europe during World War II are recounted here. They were forced to hide, to flee, to assume new identities, and were held prisoner in concentration camps.


Image result for Anne Frank book poole

Anne Frank
by Josephine Poole and illustrated by Angela Barrett

Anne Frank’s diary telling the story of her years in hiding from the Nazis has affected millions of people. But what was she like as a small girl, at home with her family and friends; at play and at school? And how did an ordinary little girl come to live such an extraordinary and tragically short life?


The missing: the true story of my family in World War II
by Michael Rosen

By turns charming, shocking, and heart-breaking, this is the true story of Michael Rosen’s search for his relatives who ‘went missing’ during the Second World War – told through prose, poetry, maps, and pictures. When Michael was growing up, stories often hung in the air about his great-uncles: one was a clock-mender and the other a dentist. They were there before the war, his dad would say, and weren’t after. Over many years, Michael tried to find out exactly what happened: he interviewed family members, scoured the Internet, pored over books and traveled to America and France. The story he uncovered was one of terrible persecution – and it has inspired his poetry for years since. Here, poems old and new are balanced against an immensely readable narrative; both an extraordinary account and a powerful tool for talking to children about the Holocaust.


Anne Frank
by Ma Isabel Sánchez Vegara and illustrated by Sveta Dorosheva

Little Anne was born in Germany to a liberal Jewish family. But when the Nazis came into power she was forced to go into hiding with her family. With innovative illustrations and extra facts at the back, this empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world. From designers and artists to scientists, all of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet all of them began life as a little child with a dream.


The promise: the true story of a family in the Holocaust
by Eva Schloss and Barbara Powers

Written specially for children, this is the true story of a young Jewish girl and her brother growing up during the Second World War, caught in a world turned upside down by the Nazis.


The horror of the Holocaust
by Claire Throp

The Holocaust was one of the most horrific events in history. This book looks at how the Nazi Party, led by Adolf Hitler, persecuted, imprisoned, and killed millions of people. Find out more about Kristallnacht, the death camps, and the creation of the State of Israel.


In spite of everything, I still believe
that people are really good at heart.

Anne Frank

Holocaust Memorial Day – Children’s booklist

The books on this list all contains themes of war, death and the Holocaust. The recommended age is set by the publishers, but parent/carer discretion is recommended as every child is different.

The boy in the striped pyjamas
by John Boyne

A story of innocence existing within the most terrible evil, this is the fictional tale of two young boys caught up in events beyond their control.
Age: 11+


Once
by Morris Gleitzman

For three years and eight months Felix has lived in a convent orphanage high in the mountains in Poland. But Felix is different from the other orphans. He is convinced his parents are still alive and will come back to get him. Escaping from the orphanage, Felix embarks on a long and dangerous journey through Nazi occupied Poland.
Age: 9+
This is the first in a series, try the others here.


When Hitler stole pink rabbit
by Judith Kerr

Partly autobiographical, this is first of the internationally acclaimed trilogy by Judith Kerr telling the unforgettable story of a Jewish family fleeing from Germany at the start of the Second World War.
Age: 9+


The Mozart question
by Michael Morpurgo

When Lesley is sent to Venice to interview world-renowned violinist Paulo Levi on his fiftieth birthday, she cannot believe her luck. She is told that she can ask him anything at all – except the Mozart question. But it is Paulo himself who decides that it is time for the truth to be told. And so follows the story of his parents as Jewish prisoners of war, forced to play Mozart violin concerti for the enemy; how they watched fellow Jews being led off to their deaths and knew that they were playing for their lives. As the story unfolds, the journalist begins to understand the full horror of war, and how one group of musicians survived using the only weapon they had – music.
Age: 7+


Image result for The dollmaker of Krakow / R.M. Romero ; with illustrations by Tomislav Tomić.

The dollmaker of Krakow
by R.M. Romero

One night a little doll named Karolina comes to life in a toyshop in Krakow, Poland, in 1939, and changes the life of the gruff, broken-hearted Dollmaker. And when the darkness of the Nazi occupation sweeps over the city Karolina and the Dollmaker must bravely use their magic to save their Jewish friends from a terrible danger, no matter what the risks.
Age: 9+


Image result for Anna and the Swallow Man / Gavriel Savit.

Anna and the Swallow Man
by Gavriel Savit

Kraków, 1939. A million marching soldiers and a thousand barking dogs. This is no place to grow up. But Anna Lania is just seven years old when the Germans take her father and suddenly, she’s alone. Then she meets the Swallow Man. He is a mystery, strange and tall. And like Anna’s missing father, he has a gift for languages: Polish, Russian, German, Yiddish, even Bird. When he summons a bright, beautiful swallow down to his hand to stop her from crying, Anna is entranced. Over the course of their travels together, Anna and the Swallow Man will dodge bombs, tame soldiers, and even, despite their better judgement, make a friend. But in a world gone mad, everything can prove dangerous.
Age: 14+


The silver sword
by Ian Serraillier

The night the Nazis come to take their mother away, three children escape in a terrifying scramble across the rooftops. Alone in the chaos of Warsaw, they have to learn to survive on their own.
Age: 9+


Non-Fiction November

Non-Fiction November was created by the Federation of Children’s Book Groups and is celebrated each November in honour of all things factual. This month long celebration is for those young readers who share a passion for reading about information, but also for those who have yet discovered the amazing world of factual books.

Libraries are a hub of information and there is so much on offer with your Hampshire library card. Why not make November the month you start your factual reading journey?
With your library card you can borrow up to 30 items at a time from your local library. If the kids have got a project to work on, instead of solely using the internet, you can pop down to the library and check out the information section and don’t forget there’s also a reservation system so you have access to books in all Hampshire Libraries.

This year the focus is on ‘Transport and Travel around the world’! It’s an exciting topic and we have some amazing books for your child to learn about travelling, transportation and the world. Check out the list below for a snippet of the many books you can find on Hampshire Library shelves. To browse all factual books for children visit our website.

Transport
by Paul Mason

This innovative series, illustrated with amazing isometric artwork, reveals the technology, science and engineering behind our world’s infrastructure. Discover in this book how transport helps us to travel around the world and the huge range of vehicles we use to move from place to place, from driverless cars to high-speed maglev trains. It also takes a look forward to see how transport might evolve in the future.

Wonders of our world
by Carron Brown and illustrated by Stef Murphy

What are the wonders of our world? Shine a light behind the page and see. From long, winding walls and reefs full of fish to lost ancient cities, the amazing wonders of our world are revealed.

Great explorers
by James Buckley, Jr.

Join the explorers and heroes that have dared to go where no-one has before. ‘Great Explorers’ is packed with fascinating facts about heroic explorers for kids just beginning to read fluently with support. From historical explorers such as Marco Polo and Christopher Columbus, to modern explorers like Bear Grylls and Erik Weihenmayer, this book covers all bases for kids interested in exploration.

Transport around the world
by Moira Butterfield

Take a journey around the world to discover the transport methods used by of children just like you! Where in the world do children learn to run their own railway? What is the best way to travel across a sandy desert? What colours are the cable cars of La Paz, in Bolivia? Children will love reading about the transport that their contemporaries in other countries use; from boats paddled between houses and carts pulled across busy cities, to riding reindeer and the fastest trains!

Amelia Earhart
by Ma Isabel Sánchez Vegara and illustrated by Mariadiamantes

In the ‘Little People, Big Dreams’ series, discover the lives of outstanding people from designers and artists to scientists. All of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet each began life as a child with a dream. This volume follows Amelia Earhart, whose strong will and self-belief helped her overcome prejudice and technical problems to become the first female flier to fly solo across the Atlantic ocean. This inspiring and informative biography comes with extra facts about her life at the end of the book.

Around the world in 80 ways
by Henrietta Drane and illustrated by Katy Halford

Travel around the world by yacht, tram, train, unicycle, jetpack, camel – any way you can imagine, in this non-fiction children’s book. Every mode of transport is part of a charming scene. See how astronauts travel around space, watch surfers ride the waves at the beach, and race to an emergency with the firefighters. Illustrator Katy Halford’s beautiful drawings brings the scenes to life and fun complementary facts will prompt discussion and laughter between readers.

If you would like to have a first hand look at the many amazing factual books you can find for children, come along to your local library today!

30 year anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall

9 November 2019 marks 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall that divided East and West Berlin.

History behind the wall

As the Second World War ended Germany’s land was divided. The east of Berlin went to the Soviet Union and the west went to the United States of America and Great Britain. The Soviets blockaded West Berlin in order to get the allies to retreat. Instead, the US began what was known as the ‘Berlin Airlift’ by delivering food and goods by air.

After this time, many people were fleeing from eastern territory into the west. To prevent the flow of citizens crossing the border for good, in two weeks a wall was built by the Soviets and anyone spotted trying to escape was immediately shot.

The fall of the wall

On 9 November 1989, the East Berlin communist party announced that the citizens were free to cross the border. Soon the wall began to come down using the help of cranes, bulldozers and even their own bare hands. The fall of the Berlin wall was seen by the citizens as the final end to the war.

Information sourced from https://www.history.com/topics/cold-war/berlin-wall

Hampshire Libraries hold books with information about the Berlin Wall and first hand accounts from the people who lived through this fractious time.

Hampshire Library Booklist

Checkpoint Charlie : the Cold War, the Berlin Wall and the most dangerous place on Earth / Iain MacGregor.

This is a powerful, fascinating, and ground-breaking history of Checkpoint Charlie, the legendary and most important military gate on the border of East and West Berlin where the United States and her allies confronted the USSR during the Cold War.

The tunnels : the untold story of the escapes under the Berlin Wall / Greg Mitchell.

In the summer of 1962, one year after the rise of the Berlin Wall, a group of daring young West Germans risked prison, Stasi torture and even death to liberate friends, lovers, and strangers in East Berlin by digging tunnels under the Wall. Then, as the world’s press heard about the secret projects, two television networks raced to be the first to document them from the inside, funding two separate tunnels for exclusive rights to film the escapes. In response, President John F. Kennedy and his administration, wary of anything that might raise tensions and force a military confrontation with the Soviets, maneuvered to quash both documentaries.

Forty autumns : a family’s story of courage and survival on both sides of the Berlin Wall / Nina Willner.

When Nina’s mother Hanna was just 20 years old, she escaped to West Germany with nothing more than a small satchel and the clothes on her back. It was the dawn of the Cold War. Hanna left her parents, siblings and everything she had ever known behind. ‘Forty Autumns’ traces the dramatic lives of the family on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Hanna eventually moved to America where she gave birth to Nina and her brother. Years after Hanna’s brave escape to the West, Nina found herself working as an Army Intelligence officer in Berlin, leading secret operations just miles away from the family her mother left behind all those years ago.

When the wall came down : the Berlin Wall and the fall of Soviet Communism / Serge Schmemann.

With full-colour maps and photographs throughout, this title presents the story of the Berlin Wall, from construction to destruction, from the point of view of a journalist who covered its fall.

Stasiland : stories from behind the Berlin Wall / Anna Funder.

In this book, Anna Funder tells the stories of people who found the courage to resist the Stasi, the communist regime’s secret police.