Summer Reading Challenge 2022 – Gadgeteers!

The Summer Reading Challenge is a great way to share stories and encourage reading throughout the summer holidays, a time when children’s reading skills can sometimes dip.

The theme of the challenge this year is Gadgeteers. Join Eddie, Leo, Ajay, Maggie, Aisha and James and discover the amazing science and innovation behind the world around you!

You can sign up at your local, Hampshire library, or online, from Saturday 16 July and read or listen to any six books to earn a certificate and medal. You can read story books, fact books, eBooks,  audiobooks, and even comics!  Once you have read/listened to your first few books, pop into your library to receive your Gadgeteers collector card and first stickers. Every time you finish reading/listening to a book, visit the library and see a member of our team to talk about the books you have read and collect your next stickers .

When you finish the challenge come to the library to collect your final stickers, finisher’s certificate and medal! Everyone who finishes the challenge has a chance to win a Samsung Galaxy tablet too!

Watch this video to find out more and see how you can take part!

The challenge is for children aged 4 – 11, and we look forward to you joining us in reading or sharing six books of your choice. Children aged 4 and under can join in the fun and earn reading star stickers throughout the summer.

You’ll find thousands of children’s eBooks and audiobooks free to download using our BorrowBox service with lots of titles always available without the wait. You’ll find links to some of our recommendations on this webpage and information about downloading ebooks and audiobooks.

If you’re not already a member of Hampshire Libraries, you can join to take part.

Meet the Gadgeteers!

Sign up, and join in the fun!

Behind the Bookshelves

Ali Archer, Stock Services Technician

What is your role and what do you like about it?

My job title is Stock Services Technician and I’m based at our Stock Support Services hub in Winchester.  Day to day I co-manage the stock services team at Bar End (in Winchester), who ensure that all the behind-the-scenes work such as sending out reading group sets and approving invoices is done.  I also develop county-wide promotions to ensure our book stock reflects current trends and affairs. Recently we created shelves on Borrowbox showcasing the work of Ukrainian writers in both fiction and non-fiction, we also included books about Ukraine in these shelves.  All of which has proven very popular with our readers.

What do I like about my role?  So many things! I’m part of a small, supportive, and friendly team where I get to talk all things books and libraries. I think my favourite thing about this role is when I can be creative with promotions and have to research books – it gives me the perfect excuse to read lots, my to read list is continually being added to!

What did you do before you came to Hampshire Libraries?

First and foremost, I am a mum. It’s a role that I’ve had the pleasure to hold since 2001, I have four children, and all share my love of reading.  I was lucky enough to be able to stay home for the first few years of my children’s life and then I had several retail roles – I especially enjoyed working at a well-known high street store as their staff shop meant I often came home with a cut price caterpillar cake!  After that I was self-employed as a seamstress.  I created bespoke clothing and accessories using vintage patterns. My favourite makes were relaxed boho style wedding dresses, prom dresses and clothing for vintage events. I still sew, but now it’s just for myself and family.

What made you want to work at Hampshire Libraries?

I realised that I was missing the hustle and bustle of working with more than one person at the time, my youngest child was about to start infant school and I wanted to do something that would be for me but would also where I was helping others – that’s when I noticed the job advert for Romsey Library.

I’ve always been a reader, as a young child I remember making sure that the landing light was on when I was sent to bed so I could carry on reading – I devoured the Malory Towers and St Clare’s books by Enid Blyton before moving on to What Katy Did books by Susan Coolidge and the Green Gables books by L. M. Montgomery. As a teenager I loved Judy Blume – Tiger Eyes will always have a special place on my bookshelf at home. Libraries have always been a big part of my life; in fact I think walking to the library on my own was one of my first tastes of freedom as a young girl.  As I’d always felt so at home in libraries, working for Hampshire Libraries seemed a natural move to me.  I’m so glad I applied, being surrounded by books all day is just heaven!

Is there anything that surprised you about working for Hampshire Libraries?

I wasn’t prepared for the incredibly variety of library customers. A library plays such a rich and diverse role in a community – it’s not just books as I naively thought!  What surprised me most is how much I miss being around the public now that I’m not in a public facing role anymore, especially running events such as Time to Talk coffee mornings and organising the craft after a story time session. 

When I joined Stock Services, I was amazed at how much work is done behind the scenes to ensure the libraries have everything they need. Learning more about the publishing industry has been incredibly interesting, who knew that the pandemic would have a negative impact on the paper pulp industry which in turn has affected the book supply chain!

If you had to live out the rest of your life on a lonely space station overlooking the planet, which three books would you bring and why?

Firstly – why am I on a space station? I’m not sure I’d have gone through choice – I’m a little scared of the idea of space travel!  But…If I must be there then my first choice is Anne of Green Gables by L M Montgomery, I’ve already mentioned it as being one of my favourite childhood books.  It’s much like a comfort blanket as I’ve read it so many times now, we should all be a bit more Anne, she’s fun, a little a bit naughty and cares deeply about the people and things important to her. My children have also enjoyed this book, so it would be a link to my family whilst living in space. Secondly, I’d take Diary of an Apprentice Astronaut by Samantha Cristoforetti. I’ve always enjoyed reading memoirs and this one is a fascinating account of a young woman’s journey to becoming an astronaut.  She spent 200 days on board the International Space Station, so I’d dip into this book whenever I needed a boost to get through the lonely days. Finally, I’d take Taste: my life through food by Stanley Tucci. I really enjoy cooking; I love a cocktail (or three – Margaritas are my current favourite 🍸) and I adore all things Italian.  This is the book equivalent of a lazy afternoon spent in an Italian piazza with delicious coffees and pastries… and on that note I think I’ll start planning a holiday!

Find out more about Ali by signing up to our Digital Readers Book Club. The group which selects one book to read on BorrowBox each month is free to join. From this month Ali will be the online host of the group’s online discussion – on the fourth Tuesday of each month. The Wonder by Emma Donoghue to the read/listen to for March.

Death Positive Libraries

Death positive libraries aim to remove the barriers to talking about death and dying.

Almost 80% of British adults find it difficult to talk about death, even though we all have to face it. Not talking about death, not getting the right support and advice at the right time and the suffering that people go through when a loved one dies or when they are facing death themselves, puts enormous strain on mental health and wellbeing. The Covid-19 pandemic has highlighted the urgent need for supportive services for bereaved individuals, at a time of vulnerability and low resilience.

Working with Libraries Connected and following on from pilot schemes in Redbridge, Kirklees and Newcastle Library services we are launching five Death Positive Hubs in early April 2022.

Libraries are uniquely placed to be a centre for bereavement support as well as a trusted space where conversations about death and dying can take place with caring staff on hand to help.

The Hubs, which are located across the county, to ensure as many people as possible can benefit from this project, will offer

  • A specially chosen collection of books for adults offering practical information and guidance
  • A collection of books for children, which use relatable stories to help initiate conversations about death
  • Trained staff who are comfortable talking about death and able to provide practical guidance for those seeking further professional support
  • Resources containing QR codes, directing customers to our webpages and signposting to relevant support services

Our five hubs, which are based in Basingstoke Discovery Centre, Chandler’s Ford Library, New Milton Library, Stubbington Library and Waterlooville Library; will also be working in partnership with specialist charities, organisations and businesses who support those who are dying or bereaved. These partnerships will enable us to offer practical and supportive events and activities in the Death Positive hubs later this year.

Existing services within libraries will also be helpful for people seeking support within Death Positive Hubs: social groups such as ‘Knit and Knatter’ or Scrabble club, access to digital information through our public network computers and WIFI and drop-in advice clinics such as the Citizen’s Advice Bureau. Over time new groups and services will be offered, such as Death Cafes and special story times hosted by children’s bereavement specialists. We will be working with our Learning in Libraries team to offer a bespoke programme of learning too, covering a range of topics including, grief management, tackling end of life conversations, confidence building and wellbeing.

Our Death Positive books will be available in the five hubs and through Borrowbox. For physical copies, browse our online catalogue and, for a small charge, reserve the book or books you would like to pick up at your local library.

We will invite feedback from customers regarding the Death Positive booklist, exploring how useful particular titles are and suggestions for improving the collection.

International Women’s Day #BreakTheBias

International Women’s Day (IWD) March 8 is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating women’s equality.

IWD has occurred for well over a century, with the first IWD gathering in 1911 supported by over a million people. Today, IWD belongs to all groups collectively everywhere. IWD is not country, group, or organization specific. The theme of International Women’s Day 2022 is #BreakTheBias. To achieve this, we ask you to imagine a gender equal world. A world free of bias, stereotypes, and discrimination. A world that is diverse, equitable, and inclusive. A world where difference is valued and celebrated. For more information on IWD please visit their website.

Together we can forge women’s equality. Collectively we can all #BreakTheBias. We believe books, information and libraries are a great place to start, so to mark #IWD2022 we have selected some books for younger readers on the theme of inspirational women and highlights from the Women’s Fiction Prize 2022 longlist.

Books for younger readers:

The Extraordinary Life of Greta Thunberg
Devika Jina & Petra Braun

From taking part in school strikes and owning that her Asperger syndrome is her superpower, to crossing the Atlantic Ocean in a powerful stand against carbon emissions, this is the incredible story of a schoolgirl who is changing the world.

Little People, Big Dreams: Josephine Baker
Ma Isobel Sanchez Vegara

Discover the incredible life of Josephine Baker, the world-famous entertainer, activist and French Resistance agent in this true story of her life. She fought against segregation her whole life and kept going with style, whatever was thrown in her way.

Little People, Big Dreams: Jane Goodall
Ma Isobel Sanchez Vegara

When Jane was little, her father gave her a toy chimpanzee named Jubilee which inspired her lifelong love of animals. Jane went to study them in the wild, living with chimpanzees in their natural habitat and becoming famous for her pioneering approach to research.

Little People, Big Dreams: Marie Curie
Ma Isobel Sanchez Vegara

When Marie was young, she was unable to go to college because she was a woman. But when she was older, her discoveries of radium and polonium dramatically helped in the fight against cancer, and she went on to win the Nobel Prize for Physics. This moving book features stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, including a biographical timeline with historical photos and a detailed profile of the scientist’s life.

Little People, Big Dreams: Maya Angelou
Lisbeth Kaiser

Maya Angelou spent most of her childhood in Stamps, Arkansas. After a traumatic event at age eight, she stopped speaking for five years. However, Maya rediscovered her voice through books, and went on to become one of the world’s most beloved writers and speakers. This inspiring story of her life features a facts and photos section at the back.

Women’s Prize for Fiction 2022

The Women’s Prize Trust is a registered charity championing women writers on a global stage. Their goal is to empower all women to raise their voice and own their story, by shining a spotlight on outstanding and ambitious fiction by women from anywhere in the world, regardless of their age, race, nationality, or background through the annual literary award.

This year the panel of judges; Anita Sethi, Dorothy Koomson, Lorraine Candy, Pandora Sykes and Chair, Mary Ann Sieghart; chose a longlist of sixteen books, featuring both debut and acclaimed writers; which span the globe in their settings, from Trinidad, Cyprus and a dystopian England, to Cape Cod, Buchenwald, and Vietnam. We’ve selected some titles which are already available to borrow as a book, eBook or eAudiobook.

Flamingo
Rachel Elliott

Flamingo is a novel about the power of love, welcome and acceptance. It’s a celebration of kindness, of tenderness. Set in 2018 and the 80s, it’s a song for the broken-hearted and the big-hearted, and is, ultimately, a novel grown from gratitude, and a book full of wild hope.

Great Circle
Maggie Shipstead

The life of Marian Graves was always been marked by a lust for freedom and danger. In 1950, she embarks on her life’s dream – to fly a Great Circle around the globe, pole to pole. But after a crash landing, she isstranded on the Antarctic ice without enough fuel and writes one last entry in her logbook. Half a century later, Hadley Baxter, a brilliant, troubled Hollywood starlet is irresistibly drawn to play Marian Graves, a role that will lead her to probe the deepest mysteries of the vanished pilot’s life.

Remote Sympathy
Catherine Chidgey

Frau Hahn’s husband, SS Sturmbannführer Dietrich Hahn, has taken up a powerful new position as camp administrator at Buchenwald, but her stubborn obliviousness to their new circumstances is challenged when she is forced into an unlikely alliance with one of Buchenwald’s prisoners, Dr Lenard Weber, the inventor of a machine that he believed could cure cancer.

Sorrow and Bliss
Meg Mason

Everyone tells Martha Friel she is clever and beautiful, a brilliant writer who has been loved every day of her adult life by one man, her husband Patrick. A gift – her mother once said – not everybody gets. So why is everything broken? Why is Martha – on the edge of 40 – friendless, practically jobless and so often sad? And why did Patrick decide to leave? Forced to return to her childhood home to live with her dysfunctional, bohemian parents, Martha has one last chance to find out whether by starting over, she will get to write a better ending for herself.

The Book of Form and Emptiness
Ruth Ozeki

One year after the death of his beloved musician father, thirteen-year-old Benny Oh begins to hear voices. The voices belong to the things in his house – a sneaker, a broken Christmas ornament, a piece of wilted lettuce. Although Benny doesn’t understand what these things are saying, he can sense their emotional tone; when his mother develops a hoarding problem, the voices grow more clamorous.

At first Benny tries to ignore them, but soon the voices follow him outside the house driving him at last to seek refuge in the silence of a large public library, where he meets his very own Book – a talking thing – who narrates Benny’s life and teaches him to listen to the things that truly matter.

The Exhibitionist
Charlotte Mendelson

The Hanrahan family are gathering for a momentous weekend as famous artist and notorious egoist Ray Hanrahan prepares for the first exhibition of his art – one he is sure will burnish his reputation for good. But what of Lucia, Ray’s steadfast and selfless wife? She is an artist who has always had to put her roles as wife and mother first. What will happen if she decides to change? For Lucia is hiding secrets of her own, and as the weekend unfolds and the exhibition approaches, she must finally make a choice.

This One Sky Day  
Leone Ross

Dawn breaks across the archipelago of Popisho. The world is stirring awake again, each resident with their own list of things to do. A wedding feast to conjure and cook. An infidelity to investigate. A lost soul to set free. As the sun rises two star-crossed lovers try to find their way back to one another across this single day. When night falls, all have been given a gift, and many are no longer the same. The sky is pink, and some wonder if it will ever be blue again.

The Paper Palace
Miranda Cowley Heller

On a perfect August morning, Elle Bishop heads out for a swim in the pond below ‘The Paper Palace’ – her family’s holiday home in Cape Cod. As she dives beneath the water, she relives the passionate encounter she had the night before, against the side of the house that knows all her darkest secrets, while her husband and mother chatted to their guests inside… So begins a story that unfolds over twenty-four hours and fifty years, as Elle’s shocking betrayal leads her to a life-changing decision – and an ending you won’t be able to stop thinking about.

The Island of Missing Trees
Elif Shafak

1974, on the island of Cyprus. Two teenagers, from opposite sides of a divided land, meet at a tavern in the city they both call home. The tavern is the only place that Kostas, who is Greek and Christian, and Defne, who is Turkish and Muslim, can meet, in secret. This tavern provides the best food in town, the best music, the best wine, but there is something else to the place: it makes one forget, even if for just a few hours, the world outside and its immoderate sorrows.

Earth Matters March

The Earth’s climate is changing, human activity is causing our planet to warm at an alarming rate. International bodies of scientists have warned that we have just over a decade to halve our emissions to avoid the most devastating impacts of climate change on our food supply, national security, global health, extreme weather, and more.

There is no time to waste. Everyone can do something to address our climate challenge, Hampshire County Council is working with all its services to help reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, increase biodiversity and make the land we manage as resilient as possible to climate change issues like flooding.

Plans include using our land and built estate to sequester carbon; making changes across our vehicle fleet; making the food we serve our customers more sustainable; ensuring we consider climate impacts when purchasing products and services and promoting changes that we can all make at work and at home.

To help us all make small changes at work or at home Hampshire Libraries launched Earth Matters March on 1 March. This month-long campaign features 31 suggestions – published as Instagram stories – for small changes most of us can easily make.

We are supporting this campaign with three special collections of books:

Our digital library is available 24/7 via the free BorrowBox app – you can join the library online if you’re not already a member – and get access to the app straightaway. All of the books from our three environmental collections can be reserved and sent to your local library for collection – you can reserve online, but a small charge applies to cover our costs.

Books and me: on my shelves

Volunteers’ Week, which runs this year from 1-7 June, is a time to say thank you for the contribution millions of people make across the UK.

Clive Grewcock, a volunteer for Hampshire Libraries’ Home Library Service, talks about delivering books to readers who can’t get to the library, the importance of a sense of place in books and what he considers as the quintessential Dickens novel

I started volunteering for the Home Library Service just before Christmas when my wife who works at Lymington Library said they needed people to help. At the moment library staff choose the books for those who can’t come to the library and I do the deliveries and collect the returns. I’ve got four regulars who seem to appreciate the service and they all enjoy the books too so the library staff seem to be picking the right sort of books for them. One of my regulars reads a phenomenal number of books and she thinks the service is the bees’ knees. It makes a real difference and I’ll carry on with my volunteer role once my other volunteer activities start up again. 

Book habits
I read anywhere, everywhere and any time. As soon as I could read – I suppose since I was six or seven – I’ve always had a book on the go and I usually know what the next book is going to be too. I enjoyed adventure stories as a kid: like everyone I read all the Enid Blyton books. There was a series I loved called the Doctor Syn novels by Russell Thorndike (brother of actress Sybil) about a vicar who doubled as a smuggler on Romney Marsh. We used to go to the Romney Marshes as children so I loved that sense of place. 

I tend to read one book at a time although if I’m reading something a bit heavy, I might have a lighter book in between but generally it’s one book, start to finish, and then on to the next one. And since I’ve retired my books are 100% from the library.

What are you reading right now?
The book I’m reading at the moment isn’t necessarily typical of what I usually read – it’s a book that one of my Home Library Service users returned last week which caught my eye: The Manner of Men by Stuart Tootal. It’s about a unit of British paratroopers and the mission they were given ahead of D Day to take out one of the guns that swept down the main invasion beaches. Although I like history, I’m not a big reader of war books unless they are written from the standpoint of people involved. This book pieces together the story from diaries and letters from those who were in the regiment and also some letters and reference material from some of the Germans on the beaches. Another war book which has a different perspective is The Dead Man in the Bunker by Martin Pollack which follows the author as he discovers his father’s past in the Gestapo. It’s the best narrative I’ve read of how Hitler’s message was able to resonate with many Germans.

Reading patterns
I’m a regular reader of crime and detective novels especially the Scottish ones. One I particularly like is Glasgow-based writer Denise Mina who’s written two trilogies about people investigating criminals who aren’t necessarily police detectives: the Paddy Meehan series about a journalist which starts with The Field of Blood and the Garnethill trilogy about Maureen O’Donnell, a former psychiatric patient. She often interweaves real life crimes into her books.

Other authors I read in this genre include Ian Rankin, who everyone loves of course, Val McDermid, and Ann Cleeve’s Shetland series. I’m not sure what draws me to Scottish crime novels: perhaps it’s that they use a sense of place very well. I probably prefer Tartan Noir it to Scandi Noir although I’ve read a fair new Jo Nesbos. The Dublin Murder Squad by Tana French is another excellent series – the first one, In The Woods was really very good indeed.

Despite the fact I don’t usually like books with magic, I love the Peter Grant/Rivers of London novels by Ben Aaronovitch which are about a young officer in the Metropolitan Police who is recruited into a branch of the Met that deals with magic and the supernatural.  Again, the sense of place is probably what draws me to it as these novels reference London in so much detail.

All time favourites
Graham Greene is a big favourite of mine but I got to a point where I’d read every single one at least twice, although I have just reserved Brighton Rock from the library as I feel I could read that again quite happily. I usually try to read a Dickens at Christmas. Great Expectations would be my top choice possibly because I did it for O levels but also because it’s got all the classic Dickens elements: you can tell it was written as a serial as virtually every chapter is a cliff-hanger, and a character that disappears early on in the book suddenly reappears ‘Eastenders-style’ at the end. It’s Dickens to a T.

Recent recommendations
One book that’s stood out for me recently is The History of Loneliness by John Boyne. It’s about a devote Catholic priest whose his life unravels around him when revelations about child abuse in the church come to light. It’s a hugely moving book. I don’t set out looking for great writing but when I stumble across it, it really holds me.

Clive was talking to Kate Price McCarthy

Reading Well for children

Reading Well for children will support the mental health and wellbeing of children, providing children and their families and carers with information, advice and support for coping with feelings and worries, 
daily life and getting through a tough time.

The Reading Agency

All the books on this list have been chosen by children and families, as well as a panel including colleagues from public libraries, NHS England, Mind, the Royal College of GPs, and the School Library Association.
The books includes a wide range of reading levels, while also being aimed at children age 4-11. These titles will be good to read together with the child so to answer any questions that might come up; but can also be read by the child on their own.

This year’s focus is on these six areas:

Healthy minds
Feelings
Worries
The world around you
Dealing with tough times
Living well with a diagnosed condition

Below you will find the full list of the Reading Agency’s booklist, of which, all but two can be found in Hampshire Libraries. Click or tap the book cover for a link to the Hampshire Library catalogue; from which you can reserve the book for a small charge.

Healthy Minds

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What’s Going on Inside my Head?
by Molly Potter and illustrated by Sarah Jennings
Age range: 4+

We all know that healthy minds are really important but how do we make
sure we look after our mental health from a very young age? What’s Going On Inside My Head? is a book for children that explores practical ways we can keep our minds in good shape as well as our bodies. By talking about positive self-image, emotional intelligence, relationships, and mindfulness, this book will help children develop healthy habits and good coping strategies from the start. Presented in a warm, childfriendly but no-nonsense way, it will help establish solid foundations for every child’s current and future wellbeing.

Healthy for Life: Self-esteem and mental health
by Anna Claybourne and illustrated by Dan Bramall
Age range: 9+

Growing up isn’t always easy – your brain is changing and there’s many things to cope with from new emotions to stress. This book explores what is self-esteem and mental health and why it’s important, looking at topics such as mental illness, phobias, eating disorders and self-harm. It looks at techniques to deal with issues including stress reduction, mindfulness and assertiveness.

How Not to Lose It: Mental Health Sorted
by Anna Williamson and illustrated by Sophie Beer
Age range: 9+

Family. Friends. Exams. Are you finding life a struggle? At times, it can feel like nothing but problems and pressure. But the good news is that even if you’re struggling to think straight, you can learn to be the boss of your brain. Creating healthy habits. Staying in the moment. Breaking negative thought patterns. Finding things to be happy about. Tricks like this are like taking your mood to the gym – helping you feel good and bounce back from obstacles. Attitudes, fears, stress levels: take charge of yours right now!

Feelings

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How Are You Feeling Today?
by Molly Potter and illustrated by Sarah Jennings
Age range: 0+

Children have strong feelings and they can’t always handle them very well. Perfect for sharing, How Are You Feeling Today? is packed with fun, imaginative ways to help children understand and cope with a whole range of different emotions. A great dip-in book where children can choose a feeling that relates to them and then turn to the page that provides child-friendly strategies for dealing with that feeling. Helpful parent/carer notes at the back of the book provide more ideas for parents to use with their child and other strategies to try out together and practice the all-important skill of dealing with feelings.

Exploring emotions
by Paul Christelis and illustrated by Elisa Paganelli
Age range: 5+

This mindfulness story book for children includes simple mindfulness activities, which have been shown to help relieve stress and anxiety and improve health and mental well-being. This book shows children how to cope with different emotions, from anger and jealous, to sadness and disappointment. The children are gently guided into mindfulness exercises that encourage an exploration of emotions.

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Feeling Angry!
by Brian Moses and illustrated by Mike Gordon
Age range: 5+

This picture book story explores feelings of anger in a light-hearted way using everyday situations that children might be familiar with. This book
shows different reasons why young people might become angry, illustrates scenarios of them behaving angrily, and gives advice on how to calm anger in yourself and to be able to help other people. Ideal for home or classroom, this book contains notes for parents and teachers with suggestions of ways to help children deal with feeling angry.

Sometimes I Feel Sad
written and illustrated by Tom Alexander
Age range: 5+

Feeling sad is, unfortunately, a part of everyone’s life, and there’s not always an easy fix. This touching book helps explain to children that they’re not alone in feeling this way and is especially useful for children who struggle to express their feelings.

Worries

Image result for Ruby's worry / Tom Percival.

Ruby’s Worry
by Tom Percival
Age range: 3+

Ruby loves being Ruby. Until, one day, she finds a worry. At first, it’s not such a big worry, and that’s all right, but then it starts to grow. It gets bigger and bigger every day and it makes Ruby sad. How can Ruby get rid of it and feel like herself again?
When Ruby makes a friend – who has a worry too – and talks about what’s
bothering her, everything explodes with colour and the world goes back to normal. Ruby soon realises that everybody gets worries, and they are nothing to be ashamed of.
This is a perceptive and poignant story about anxiety and how a problem shared is a problem halved.

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Questions and Feelings About: Worries
by Paul Christelis and illustrated by Ximena Jeria
Age range: 5+

A gentle, down to earth book for addressing the things that can cause
children to be anxious and worried. Mindfulness expert Paul Christelis
expertly explores everyday situations in picture book form, helping children to recognise signs of worry and giving them reassurance and simple suggestions on how to cope with any worries

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Grobblechops
by Elizabeth Laird, illustrated by Jenny Lucander
Age range: 5+

Amir doesn’t want to go to bed. He is scared of the dark and afraid there might be a monster under his bed; a monster called Grobblechops who has huge teeth and growls like a tiger. Dad reassures Amir that if he growls louder, the monster will go away – but Amir can’t help catastrophising and worrying that Grobblechops’s mum and dad will join in the fight and eat him up. Luckily, Amir’s dad is a bit of an expert when it comes to monsters, and can rationalise and defuse all his son’s anxiety to the point where Grobblechops becomes a friend rather than a threat.
Stunning, collage-style illustrations reflect the quelling of Amir’s fears as Grobblechops and his parents subtly mutate from frightening to friendly.

Me and My Fear
written and illustrated by Francesca Sanna
Age range: 5+

When a young girl has to travel to a new country and start at a new school, her Fear tells her to be alone and afraid. How can she hope to make friends if she doesn’t understand their language? A heart-warming and relevant new tale from the bestselling author and illustrator of The Journey, this book shows us the importance of sharing your Fear with others – after all, everyone carries a Fear with them, even if it’s small enough to fit into their pocket!

All Birds Have Anxiety
by Kathy Hoopmann
Age range: 6+

Life as a bird can be stressful! From worrying about airplanes, windows, and getting enough worms to eat, it is clear that birds can be anxious beings. Through a light-touch, quizzical depiction of bird behaviour, All Birds Have Anxiety uses colourful images and astute explanations to explore with gentle humour what it means to live with anxiety day-today, and how to begin to deal with it. The combination of understanding and gentle humour makes this the ideal introduction to anxiety disorder for those diagnosed with this condition, their family and friends and those generally interested in understanding anxiety.

Worry Angels
by Sita Brahmachari and illustrated by Jane Ray
Age range: 8+

Amy May knows about webs of worries – so many people she meets are caught in them, from her own artist dad to newly arrived refugee Rima and her family. By being brave enough to open up her worry box, Amy May helps all those around her find a way forward. Particularly suitable for struggling, reluctant and dyslexic readers.

Outsmarting Worry
by Dawn Huebner, illustrated by Kara McHale
Age range: 9+

Worry has a way of growing, shifting from not-a-big-deal to a VERY BIG DEAL in the blink of an eye. This big-deal Worry is tricky, luring children into behaviours that keep the anxiety cycle going. Children often find it hard to fight back against Worry, but not anymore. Outsmarting Worry teaches 9-13-year olds and the adults who care about them a specific set of skills that makes it easier to face – and overcome – worries and fears. Smart, practical, proven techniques are presented in language immediately accessible to children with an emphasis on shifting from knowing to doing, from worried to happy and free.

The World Around You

At school

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Dealing With Bullying
by Jane Lacey and illustrated by Venitia Dean
Age range: 7+

This book teaches readers how to deal with bullies and make sure they don’t give in to peer pressure to bully others. It features seven stories from children who have a range of bullying problems from a girl who is being left out by her friends to a boy bullied for the way he speaks. It features both verbal and physical bullying. The stories help readers understand and empathise with characters, while also offering practical advice that readers can use in their everyday lives. The end of the book features a short playscript to act out and discuss.

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Accidental Trouble Magnet: (Planet Omar)
by Zanib Mian and illustrated by Nasaya Mafaridik
Age range: 6+

Planet Omar is a book about being different, growing friendships and overcoming hurdles.
Omar has just moved into a new house with his family: sticky-fingered little brother Esa, snooty older sister Maryam and his scientist parents. Going to a new school turns out to be okay, apart from the fact that class bully Daniel tells Omar that because he’s a Muslim, he’s going to be kicked out of the country and will have to go and live in Pakistan. Understandably worried, Omar asks his cousin if that’s true, and both hope it isn’t, because there’s a distinct lack of good pizza there. Plus, there’s mean Mrs Rogers next door who complains loudly about Omar’s mum frying onions.
Yet when mean Mrs Rogers has an accident, Omar’s family is there to help. And when Omar and bully Daniel get stranded on a school trip in London, Omar realises that Danny isn’t so tough after all…

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The Illustrated Guide to Dyslexia and Its Amazing People
by Kate Power and Kathy Iwanczak Forsyth
Age group: 7+

Use this guide to weed out what dyslexia means for you and discover the tools you need to blossom! Dyslexia comes to life with visual imagery and colourful text in this new book on what dyslexia means, how it feels, what to do about it, and how to learn to embrace it. This beautifully designed book, complete with stunning visuals and gentle humour, approaches the subject of dyslexia in a simple and encouraging way for all age groups. By showing what dyslexia is and asking the reader how it applies to them, this book offers a fun and engaging means of working out how dyslexia affects the individual specifically, with a multitude of learning tools and tips, and a gallery of inspirational dyslexics who have used their particular skills to do something amazing with their lives.

Ella on the Outside
by Cath Howe
Age range: 8+

Ella is facing some big changes. She’s just had to start at a new school, she’s moved away from her best friend Grace, her eczema is acting up, and on top of all that, she has a huge secret to keep about her family. So, when Lydia, the most popular girl in school, wants to start hanging out, things must be on the up… right?
The only problem is, Lydia really wants to know what Ella’s hiding and she’s also desperate for intel on the quiet girl in class, Molly. So just how far will Ella go to keep her new friendship?
Ella on the Outside is a hugely relatable tale that will strike a chord with anyone who has felt the pressure to please a new friend or has struggled to fit in. Ella makes mistakes, but she’s also hugely likeable, and author Cath Howe perfectly captures her anxieties and worries.

Online

#Goldilocks: a hashtag cautionary tale
by Jeanne Willis and illustrated by Tony Ross
Age range: 3+

Everyone loves Goldilocks’ hilarious online videos, but in her quest to
get more likes, more laughs and more hits, she tries something a little
more daring: stealing porridge #pipinghot, breaking chairs #fun, and
using someone else’s bed #sleep. What will Daddy Bear do when he
sees that online?
A hilarious cautionary tale for a new generation of internet-users from the prize-winning partnership of Jeanne Willis and Tony Ross, the third of its kind following Chicken Clicking and Troll Stinks.

In the news

Something Bad Happened: A kid’s guide to coping with events in the news
by Dawn Huebner, illustrated by Kara Mchale
Age range: 6+

Full of advice for children who may be worried about events in the news, this guide from best-selling author Dawn Huebner offers advice for having tough conversations with 6-12 year olds about world events such as natural disasters, terrorism and war. It addresses common questions and provides tools to calm fears.

Dealing with tough times

When someone dies

Mum’s Jumper written and illustrated
by Jayde Perkin
Age range: 4+

If Mum has gone, how do you carry on? Missing her feels like a dark cloud that follows you around, or like swimming to a shore that never comes any nearer. But memories are like a jumper that you can cuddle and wear. And Mum s jumpermight be a way to keep her close.
A simple, heartfelt and ultimately uplifting book for anyone coping with loss.

Michael Rosen’s Sad Book
by Michael Rosen and illustrated by Quentin Blake
Age range: 5+

Michael Rosen’s Sad Book chronicles Michael’s grief at the death of his son Eddie from meningitis at the age of 19. A moving combination of sincerity and simplicity, it acknowledges that sadness is not always avoidable or reasonable and perfects the art of making complicated feelings plain.

If all the world were…
by Joseph Coelho and illustrated by Alison Colpoys
Age range: 5+

A moving, lyrical picture book about a young girl’s love for her granddad and how she copes when he dies, written by poet and playwright Joseph Coelho.
This beautifully illustrated, powerful and ultimately uplifting text is the ideal way to introduce children to the concept of death and dying, particularly children who have lost a grandparent.

Clownfish
by Alan Durant
Age range: 10+


Dak’s dad has been dead for seven days when suddenly he reappears. He’s the same in almost every way, with one startling exception: Dad has turned into a clownfish, and now lives in a tank at their local aquarium. Dak is delighted by the news – he has Dad back, even if he isn’t quite as he was before. Deciding to keep Dad’s transformation a secret, Dak visits him at the aquarium as often as he can and ends up spending so much time there that they offer him a job. This is how he comes to meet Violet, the owner’s prickly but kind-hearted niece; when the aquarium is threatened with closure, the pair must work together to save it. For Dak, the stakes couldn’t be higher… after all, if the aquarium shuts down, what will happen to the fish?

Getting through a tough time

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The Boy Who Built a Wall Around Himself
by Ali Redford and illustrated by Kara Simpson
Age range: 4+

Boy built a wall to keep himself safe. Behind it he felt strong and more protected. Then Someone Kind came along. She bounced a ball, sang and painted on the other side of the wall, and Boy began to wonder if life on the other side might be better after all. Written for children aged 4 to 9, this gentle full-colour picture book uses a simple metaphor to explain how children who have had painful or traumatic experiences can build barriers between themselves and other people. It will help children explore their feelings and encourage communication.

Tough times at home

Up and Down Mum
by Child’s Play and Wellcome Trust and illustrated by Summer Macon
Age range: 3+

Living with Mum is a bit like a roller coaster ride. At times, she is excited and full of energy, but at others, she is tired and withdrawn. But she’s always my mum, and we’re sharing the ride. For children who grow up in the care of a parent with mental health problems, life can be filled with anxiety and uncertainty. With the aid of a clear and simple information spread, this story helps us to understand the causes of mental illness and how we can learn to live with someone who has it. Developed in close consultation with families with parental mental health conditions and created in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust.

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The Colour Thief: A families’ story of depression
by Andrew Fusek Peters and Polly Peters and illustrated by Karin Littlewood
Age range: 5+

The Colour Thief is a simple, heart-warming tale which helps to open up the
conversations around depression and to support young children whose families have been affected. We follow a young boy who loves spending time with his dad, doing fun things together. When his father becomes sad and distant, he doesn’t understand and believes he has done something to make his dad so, despite being told otherwise. Narrated from the child’s perspective, this is the perfect book to read with children who are trying to understand the 11 cause and effects of depression and reassure them that depression passes, and their parents are not lost to them.

Living well with a diagnosed condition

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Can I Tell You About ADHD?
by Susan Yarney and illustrated by Chris Martin
Age range: 7+

Meet Ben – a young boy with ADHD. Ben invites readers to learn about ADHD from his perspective. He helps children understand what it means to have ADHD and describes what it is and how it feels. Ben explains how he was diagnosed and what he has learnt about ways to relieve his ADHD symptoms, and how friends and adults can help at home and school. This illustrated book is full of useful information and will be an ideal introduction for young people, aged 7 upwards, as well as parents, friends, teachers and professionals working with children with ADHD. It is also an excellent starting point for family and classroom discussions.

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Check Mates
by Stewart Foster
Age range: 9+

Felix is struggling at school. His ADHD makes it hard for him to concentrate and his grades are slipping. Everyone keeps telling him to try harder, but no one seems to understand just how hard he finds it. When Mum suggests Felix spends time with his grandfather, Felix can’t think of anything worse. Granddad hasn’t been the same since Grandma died. Plus, he’s always trying to teach Felix boring chess. But sometimes the best lessons come in the most unexpected of places, and Granddad soon shows Felix that there’s everything to play for.

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

Autism
by Louise Spilsbury
Age range: 5+

This book explores the many aspects of Autism in a child-friendly way. It
offers practical help, tips and advice as well as exploring everyday
situations, supported by, exquisite and approachable illustrations to give
a comforting story book feel, particularly suited to 5-7-year olds, but with
scope to appeal to both younger and older children. A perfect aid to help
children open up and explore how they feel and give steps they can take
to help them cope.

M is for Autism
by The Students of Limpsfield Grange School, Martin and Vicky Martin
Age range: 9+

M. That’s what I’d like you to call me please. I’ll tell you why later. Welcome to M’s world. It’s tipsy-turvy, sweet and sour, and the beast of anxiety lurks outside classrooms ready to pounce. M just wants to be like other teenagers her age who always know what to say and what to do. So why does it feel like she lives on a different plane of existence to everyone else? Written by the students of Limpsfield Grange, a school for girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder with communication and interaction difficulties, M is for Autism draws on real life experiences to create a heartfelt and humorous novel that captures the highs and lows of being different in a world of normal.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

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Double Felix
by Sally Harris and illustrated by Maria Serrano
Age range: 7+

He skips every second step when he takes the stairs, taps door handles twice and positions objects in pairs. The problem has become so bad that Felix is on the verge of being expelled from school because the principal has had enough of trying to run the school around his very specific rules. Then Charlie Pye arrives and turns his world upside down. She is grown up with very few rules. She eats cereal for lunch, calls a boat home, and has a very loose interpretation of school uniform. The question is, can Felix ever learn to be wrong when he is so obsessed with being right?

Having a disability

Image result for Having a disability / Louise Spilsbury ; illustrated by Ximena Jeria.

Questions and Feelings About: Having a disability
by Louise Spilsbury and illustrated by Ximena Jeria
Age range: 5+

How do you help a young child deal with disability or explain what that means? This hands-on picture book is designed to help children with their questions and feelings about tricky topics that can be hard to talk about. The exquisite and approachable illustrations to give a comforting story book feel. A perfect aid to help children open up and explore how they feel and steps they can take to help them cope.

You can find these books, and more, in our When a Book Might Help collection.

International Day of Persons with Disabilities

3 December 2019

The UN celebrate this day every year on 3 December and the theme for this year is ‘Promoting the participation of persons with disabilities and their leadership‘. Their aim is to ensure that all are treated equally and to make the world a more inclusive place.

Libraries have many different ways of being inclusive to all, some of those being dyslexia friendly books, large print, audiobooks and braille books.

Booktrust have created a list of books to read with your children and these are some of the few that we have on our library catalogue:

Song for a whale / Lynne Kelly.

Iris was born deaf, but she’s never let that define her; after all, it’s the only life she’s ever known. And until recently she wasn’t even very lonely, because her grandparents are both deaf, too. But Grandpa has just died and Grandma’s not the same without him. The only place Iris really feels at home anymore is in her electronics workshop where she loves taking apart antique radios. Then, during a science lesson about sound waves, Iris finds out about a whale who is unable to communicate with other whales. The lonely whale awakens something in Iris. She’s determined to show him that someone in the world knows he’s there.

Lightning chase me home / Amber Lee Dodd.

Amelia McLeod lives on a tiny Scottish island, her mum has walked out on her and she’s about to start at a whole new, scary school. Her dyslexia means she’s a target for the school bullies. When she makes a wish on her birthday to be reunited with her mum, she finds herself quite literally disappearing at times of stress and reappearing elsewhere on the island, where she finds clues and snapshots of her parents’ past.

Amazing / Steve Antony.

A little boy and his pet dragon are the very best of friends. They laugh, they sing, they dance, they snooze. They are both amazing – just like everyone else! A celebration of friendship and being yourself with a positive message about celebrating diversity.

Me and my sister / Rose Robbins.

This appealing brother and sister duo spend a lot of their day together, eating meals, going to school and playing. But life with an autistic sibling is not always easy. Through the eyes of the brother, we find out how they are both very different, but also very similar in other ways, and come what may they have lots of fun together and love each other just the same. This is a touching book that will strike a chord with every family with siblings, especially where one is differently abled.

Can you see me? : expected to fit in, proud to stand out / Libby Scott & Rebecca Westcott.

People think that because Tally’s autistic, she doesn’t realise what they’re thinking, but Tally sees and hears – and notices – all of it. Endearing, insightful and warmly uplifting, this is a story of autism, empathy and kindness that will touch readers of all ages.

Winter Reading Challenge 2019

For this year’s Winter Reading Challenge we’re thrilled to be working with Penguin Publishing to bring The Snowman and the Snowdog to our libraries.
From 1 December children will be able to come into the library and pick up a collector card and collect a sticker for each library book they read or listen to.
After reading or listening to four library books they will receive a certificate!
Whilst aimed at ages 4 to 11, everyone can take part no matter their age, and they have until 26 January to finish.
There’s no need to sign up; just visit your local library* to collect stickers and earn a certificate.

All library books count towards the challenge: eBooks, audiobooks, books read to the child, chapter books, picture books, graphic novels and any other kind of book that you can borrow from the library.
It’s free to take part in the Winter Reading Challenge, with a suggested donation of £1.

*Excluding Kingsclere Library, Lowford Library, Milford-on-Sea Library and North Baddesley Library

Looking for books for your child, or books to read together this winter? Have a look at these great winter themed books that you can borrow from Hampshire Libraries.

Books suitable for ages 0-4:

The Snowman
by Raymond Briggs

This classic picture book describes the friendship between a boy and a snowman and their magical journey over a sparkling winter landscape.
Ages 0+

The snowman and the snowdog
by Hilary Audus

The Snowman flies again! One winter’s night a little boy is taken on a breathtaking and magical adventure beyond his wildest dreams when the Snowman and Snowdog he has built come to life and take him over the rooftops and across the sea to the North Pole.
Ages 0+

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The snow dragon
by Abi Elphinstone and Fiona Woodcock

When the first snow of winter falls, Phoebe watches it from her bedroom in Griselda Bone’s Home For Strays, wishing that the snow will bring with it some much-needed magic. However, in Griselda Bone’s orphanage magic is banned, along with daydreaming and doodling, and Phoebe’s day goes from bad to worse. But just when she’s about to give up hope, a Snow Dragon appears and whisks her away on an adventure, and maybe, just maybe, there’s enough magic to save Phoebe.
Ages 3+

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Moomin and the ice festival
based on the original stories by Tove Jansson

It’s winter in Moominvalley and Moomintroll and his family are getting ready for the Long Winter Sleep. But as the first flakes of snow fall, they receive an exciting invitation to the Ice Festival. Will they be brave enough to venture out now winter is here?
Ages 3+

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Funny footprints
by Katie Dale and Nanette Regan

In this story, it is Ben’s birthday and it is snowing! He goes for a walk with Dad and sees some very funny footprints in the snow. Where could they lead?
Ages 3+

Books suitable for ages 5-8:

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Isadora Moon makes winter magic
by Harriet Muncaster

Isadora loves playing in the snow, especially when her creations come to life! But snow magic can’t last forever. Will she be able to save her new friends before they melt away? This book is also bursting with activities and fun things to make and do!
Ages 5+

The Snow Goose
by Anne Booth

Every year the magnificent silver Snow Goose brings winter to the Magical Kingdom of Birds. But this year something is wrong: why hasn’t he arrived? Lord Astor must be up to his tricks again. Can Maya and her friends uncover the mystery behind the missing snow goose, and bring winter to the kingdom?
Ages 5+

Pugs of the frozen north
by Philip Reeve and Sarah McIntyre

And they’re off! Who will win the Race to the Top of the World? Helga Hammerfest and her polar bears; bounder and cheat Sir Basil-Dumpling; Shackleton Jones with his robot-powered sled ?But wait! What’s this? Two kids riding a sled pulled by 66 pugs wearing jumpers?! The underdogs are coming!
Ages 6+

The Snowman
by Michael Morpurgo

When James wakes to see snow falling one December morning, he is delighted and rushes outside to make a snowman. With coal eyes, an old green hat and scarf and a tangerine nose, he is perfect and James can hardly bear to go inside and leave him. In the middle of the night, he wakes and creeps out to see his snowman again – and to his amazement, the snowman comes to life!
Ages: 7+

A boy called Christmas
by Matt Haig

You are about to read the true story of Father Christmas. It is a story that proves that nothing is impossible. If you are one of those people who believe that some things are impossible, you should put this book down right away. It is most certainly not for you. Because this book is full of impossible things. Are you still reading? Good. Then let us begin. A tale of adventure, snow, kidnapping, elves, more snow, and an 11-year-old boy called Nikolas, who isn’t afraid to believe in magic.
Ages 7+

Books suitable for ages 9-10:

Shadows of winterspell
by Amy Wilson

Enter the thousand worlds of Amy Wilson in her captivating novel, ‘Shadows of Winterspell’, sparkling with frost and magic. Stella has been living behind the magic of the forest for most of her life. Lonely, she enrolls at the local school, and as she begins to make friends, she discovers that she is even more different than she thought. But as autumn turns to magical winter, Stella realises that uncovering her own family secret is the only way to release the forest from the grip of a dark and old magic.
Ages 9+

Image result for Father Christmas's fake beard / the fantastically funny Terry Pratchett ; illustrated by Mark Beech.

Father Christmas’s fake beard
by Terry Pratchett

Have you ever wanted Christmas to be different? Turkey and carols, presents and crackers – they all start to feel a bit samey. How about a huge exploding mince pie, a pet abominable snowman, or a very helpful partridge in a pear tree? What if Father Christmas went to work at a zoo, or caused chaos in a toy store, or was even arrested for burglary? Dive into the fantastically funny world of Terry Pratchett, for a festive treat like no other.
Ages 9+

The eye of the north
by Sinéad O’Hart

When Emmeline’s parents mysteriously disappear, she finds herself flung into an adventure that takes her to the frozen north. There evil Dr Siegfried Bauer is plotting to awaken a mythical creature from the deep. And he’s not the only one determined to unleash the terrible beast. Can Emmeline stop their fiendish plans and save the world?
Ages 9+

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The way past winter
by Kiran Millwood Hargrave

When Mila’s brother disappears, she believes he’s been taken by the Bear, a hooded stranger of legend who sought shelter at their home. Mila and her sisters follow his trail into the frozen north, determined to find a way past winter and bring their brother home.
Ages 10+

Books suitable for ages 11-13:

A Christmas Carol
by Charles Dickens

Set in Victorian England and highlighting the social injustice of the time we see one Ebeneezer Scrooge go from oppressor to benefactor when he gets a rude awakening to how his life is, and how it should be.
Ages 11+

Whiteout
by Gabriel Dylan

A school ski trip to a remote Alpine resort descends into terror when a snowstorm cuts off the group from the rest of the world. For, as Charlie and his classmates are about to discover, something ancient and evil lies in wait.
Ages 11+

All wrapped up
by Holly Smale

Harriet Manners knows a lot about Christmas. She knows that every year Santa climbs down 91.8 million chimneys. She knows that Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer was almost definitely a girl. She knows that the first artificial Christmas trees were made out of goose feathers. But this Christmas is extra special for Harriet, because four days ago she had her first ever kiss. Now she just needs to work out what’s supposed to happen next.
Ages 11+

The winter place
by Alexander Yates

When a mysterious stranger and his brown bear show up on the same day that Axel and Tess are orphaned, Axel knows nothing will ever be the same. However, the strange duo are quickly forgotten when Axel and Tess are shipped off to Finland to stay with grandparents that they’ve never met. But when they arrive in Finland, Axel is stunned when the stranger and his bear reappear. More incredibly, the stranger tells him that his parents are lost and need help. Desperate to see his father again, and actually meet his mother, Axel follows the man and his bear, disappearing deep into the frozen wilds of northern Finland. 
Ages 12+

⛄️❄️📚 Happy reading! 📚❄️⛄️

Non-Fiction November

Non-Fiction November was created by the Federation of Children’s Book Groups and is celebrated each November in honour of all things factual. This month long celebration is for those young readers who share a passion for reading about information, but also for those who have yet discovered the amazing world of factual books.

Libraries are a hub of information and there is so much on offer with your Hampshire library card. Why not make November the month you start your factual reading journey?
With your library card you can borrow up to 30 items at a time from your local library. If the kids have got a project to work on, instead of solely using the internet, you can pop down to the library and check out the information section and don’t forget there’s also a reservation system so you have access to books in all Hampshire Libraries.

This year the focus is on ‘Transport and Travel around the world’! It’s an exciting topic and we have some amazing books for your child to learn about travelling, transportation and the world. Check out the list below for a snippet of the many books you can find on Hampshire Library shelves. To browse all factual books for children visit our website.

Transport
by Paul Mason

This innovative series, illustrated with amazing isometric artwork, reveals the technology, science and engineering behind our world’s infrastructure. Discover in this book how transport helps us to travel around the world and the huge range of vehicles we use to move from place to place, from driverless cars to high-speed maglev trains. It also takes a look forward to see how transport might evolve in the future.

Wonders of our world
by Carron Brown and illustrated by Stef Murphy

What are the wonders of our world? Shine a light behind the page and see. From long, winding walls and reefs full of fish to lost ancient cities, the amazing wonders of our world are revealed.

Great explorers
by James Buckley, Jr.

Join the explorers and heroes that have dared to go where no-one has before. ‘Great Explorers’ is packed with fascinating facts about heroic explorers for kids just beginning to read fluently with support. From historical explorers such as Marco Polo and Christopher Columbus, to modern explorers like Bear Grylls and Erik Weihenmayer, this book covers all bases for kids interested in exploration.

Transport around the world
by Moira Butterfield

Take a journey around the world to discover the transport methods used by of children just like you! Where in the world do children learn to run their own railway? What is the best way to travel across a sandy desert? What colours are the cable cars of La Paz, in Bolivia? Children will love reading about the transport that their contemporaries in other countries use; from boats paddled between houses and carts pulled across busy cities, to riding reindeer and the fastest trains!

Amelia Earhart
by Ma Isabel Sánchez Vegara and illustrated by Mariadiamantes

In the ‘Little People, Big Dreams’ series, discover the lives of outstanding people from designers and artists to scientists. All of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet each began life as a child with a dream. This volume follows Amelia Earhart, whose strong will and self-belief helped her overcome prejudice and technical problems to become the first female flier to fly solo across the Atlantic ocean. This inspiring and informative biography comes with extra facts about her life at the end of the book.

Around the world in 80 ways
by Henrietta Drane and illustrated by Katy Halford

Travel around the world by yacht, tram, train, unicycle, jetpack, camel – any way you can imagine, in this non-fiction children’s book. Every mode of transport is part of a charming scene. See how astronauts travel around space, watch surfers ride the waves at the beach, and race to an emergency with the firefighters. Illustrator Katy Halford’s beautiful drawings brings the scenes to life and fun complementary facts will prompt discussion and laughter between readers.

If you would like to have a first hand look at the many amazing factual books you can find for children, come along to your local library today!