Divorce and Separation

The break down of a family is nearly always a traumatic event for those involved, especially for children. There are many books that present the subject in a postive and sensitive way. Sharing these books may be comforting to children going through similar situations.


book cover

Two Nests – Laurence Anholt and Jim Coplestone

A gentle story about family separation.  When Baby Bird is born the nest starts to feel very small and Betty and Paul squabble.  They decide Paul should live in a different nest and Baby Bird is able to spend time in both his homes.
Age: 3+


book cover

There For You – Annette Aubrey

Mum and Dad explain to a young boy why they are separating, offering lots of reassurance to allay worries and fears.
Age: 3+


book cover

Two of Everything – Babette Cole

Irreverent look at divorce with the underlying message that divorce is preferable to living with unhappy parents. This is not a serious examination of the issue!
Age: 7+


book cover

Mum and Dad Glue – Kes Gray

A little boy tries to find a pot of glue that will stick his parents’ smiles back on and make their marriage better.  He learns that even though his Mum and Dad’s relationship may be broken, their love for him is not.
Age: 4+


A New Room for William – Sally Grindley and Carol Thompson

A reassuring story about a new home with Mum after the parents’ separation and about making a new friend.
Age: 4+


book cover

Grace & Family – Mary Hoffman

Heart warming story about a young girl learning to live with two families, one in Britain and one in Africa, after her parents divorce. Beautifully illustrated.
Age: 5+


book cover

Every Second Friday – Kiri Lightfoot and Ben Galbraith

A brother and sister spend alternate weekends with their father. A story about belonging in two places.
Age: 4+


book cover

Two Homes – Claire Masurel

A positive and encouraging look at the advantages, rather than disadvantages, of two homes. Told from the child’s view point.
Age: 3+


book cover

Living with Mum and Living with Dad: My Two Homes – Melanie Walsh

A simple lift-the-flap book which is reassuring for very young children.
Age: 3+


Useful Organisation

Gingerbread

Works nationally and locally for and with single parents to improve their lives

www.gingerbread.org.uk

Divorce and Separation

The break down of a family is nearly always a traumatic event for those involved, especially for children. There are many books that present the subject in a postive and sensitive way. Sharing these books may be comforting to children going through similar situations.


Two Nests
by Laurence Anholt and Jim Coplestone

A gentle story about family separation.  When Baby Bird is born the nest starts to feel very small and Betty and Paul squabble.  They decide Paul should live in a different nest and Baby Bird is able to spend time in both his homes.
Age: 3+


There For You
by Annette Aubrey

Mum and Dad explain to a young boy why they are separating, offering lots of reassurance to allay worries and fears.
Age: 3+


Two of Everything
by Babette Cole

Irreverent look at divorce with the underlying message that divorce is preferable to living with unhappy parents. This is not a serious examination of the issue!
Age: 7+


Image result for I don't want Danny here / by Elizabeth Dale

I don’t want Danny here
by Elizabeth Dale

Izzy doesn’t like Danny. And Danny will be coming to live with them after his mum marries her dad. When Danny comes for a sleepover, things are very strained. Then Izzy starts to see things from Danny’s point of view, and their relationship begins to change.
Age: 6+


Mum and Dad Glue
by Kes Gray

A little boy tries to find a pot of glue that will stick his parents’ smiles back on and make their marriage better.  He learns that even though his Mum and Dad’s relationship may be broken, their love for him is not.
Age: 4+


Image result for A new room for William

A New Room for William
by Sally Grindley and Carol Thompson

A reassuring story about a new home with Mum after the parents’ separation and about making a new friend.
Age: 4+


Grace & Family
by Mary Hoffman

Heart warming story about a young girl learning to live with two families, one in Britain and one in Africa, after her parents divorce. Beautifully illustrated.
Age: 5+


Every Second Friday
by Kiri Lightfoot and Ben Galbraith

A brother and sister spend alternate weekends with their father. A story about belonging in two places.
Age: 4+


Two Homes
by Claire Masurel

A positive and encouraging look at the advantages, rather than disadvantages, of two homes. Told from the child’s view point.
Age: 3+


Image result for Living with mum and living with dad

Living with Mum and Living with Dad: My Two Homes
by Melanie Walsh

A simple lift-the-flap book which is reassuring for very young children.
Age: 3+


Useful Organisation

Care for the family:
Support and information for families.

Family action:
Transforms lives by providing practical, emotional and financial support to those who are experiencing poverty, disadvantage and social isolation across the country.

Family Lives:
A national charity providing help and support in all aspects of family life.

Gingerbread:
Works nationally and locally for and with single parents to improve their lives

Mrs Robinson’s Disgrace by Kate Summerscale

About the book

When the married Isabella Robinson was introduced to the dashing Edward Lane at a party in 1850, she was utterly enchanted. He was ‘fascinating’, she told her diary, before chastising herself for being so susceptible to a man’s charms. But a wish had taken hold of her, and she was to find it hard to shake…

In one of the most notorious divorce cases of the nineteenth century, Isabella Robinson’s scandalous secrets were exposed to the world. Kate Summerscale brings vividly to life a frustrated Victorian wife’s longing for passion and learning, companionship and love, in a society clinging to rigid ideas about marriage and female sexuality.

Reviewed by Everton

“An interesting revelation of the social moves of the Victorian era. The sexual aspect was covered well in it’s explorations of treatment of ‘deviations in behaviour’ A woman craving affection and seeking what she could get, Isabella was probably typical of a woman of her generation – but in some ways before her time”

star rating ** ½

 

 

Read this book

Request to borrow a reading book set

http://www3.hants.gov.uk/borrow-book-sets.htm

The Bolter by Frances Osborne

About the book

On Friday 25th May, 1934, a forty-one-year-old woman walked into the lobby of Claridge’s Hotel to meet the nineteen-year-old son whose face she did not know. Fifteen years earlier, as the First World War ended, Idina Sackville shocked high society by leaving his multimillionaire father to run off to Africa with a near penniless man. An inspiration for Nancy Mitford’s character The Bolter, painted by William Orpen, and photographed by Cecil Beaton, Sackville went on to divorce a total of five times, yet died with a picture of her first love by her bed. Her struggle to reinvent her life with each new marriage left one husband murdered and branded her the ‘high priestess’ of White Mischief’s bed-hopping Happy Valley in Kenya. Sackville’s life was so scandalous that it was kept a secret from her great-granddaughter Frances Osborne. Now, Osborne tells the moving tale of betrayal and heartbreak behind Sackville’s road to scandal and return, painting a dazzling portrait of high society in the early twentieth century.

Reviewed by Godshill WI

Mixed feelings. A controversial character – but how much was accurate? A tad overwritten – understandable after five marriages!

star rating **

 

Read this book

Request to borrow a reading book set

http://www3.hants.gov.uk/borrow-book-sets.htm

Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search For Everything by Elizabeth Gilbert

About the book

It’s 3 a.m. and Elizabeth Gilbert is sobbing on the bathroom floor. She’s in her thirties, she has a husband, a house, they’re trying for a baby – and she doesn’t want any of it. A bitter divorce and a turbulent love affair later, she emerges battered and bewildered and realises it is time to pursue her own journey in search of three things she has been missing: pleasure, devotion and balance. So she travels to Rome, where she learns Italian from handsome, brown-eyed identical twins and gains twenty-five pounds, an ashram in India, where she finds that enlightenment entails getting up in the middle of the night to scrub the temple floor, and Bali where a toothless medicine man of indeterminate age offers her a new path to peace: simply sit still and smile. And slowly happiness begins to creep up on her.

Reviewed by In Sync

“Not all of us finished this book – as they found it boring, especially the middle bit on India, all to do with meditation. Italy and Bali were more interesting. It needs editing – there are a lot of repetitions

star rating *

Read this book

Request to borrow a reading book set

http://www3.hants.gov.uk/borrow-book-sets.htm

 

The Sealed Letter by Emma Donoghue

About the book

Helen Codrington is unhappily married. Emily ‘Fido’ Faithfull hasn’t seen her once-dear friend for years. Suddenly, after bumping into Helen on the streets of Victorian London, Fido finds herself reluctantly helping Helen to have an affair with a young army officer. The women’s friendship quickly unravels amid courtroom accusations of adultery, counter-accusations of cruelty and attempted rape, and the appearance of a mysterious ‘sealed letter’ that could destroy more than one life . . . Based on a real-life scandal that gripped England in 1864, The Sealed Letter is a delicious tale of secrets, betrayal, and forbidden love.

Reviewed by Goodworth Clatford WI Reading Group:

A good read. True to its time. Interesting about the change in womens opportunities. Interesting regarding divorce at that time.

Star rating: ***

Read the book

Request to borrow a reading group set