Why be Happy When You Could be Normal by Jeanette Winterson

About the book

In 1985 Jeanette Winterson’s first novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, was published. It was Jeanette’s version of the story of a terraced house in Accrington, an adopted child, and the thwarted giantess Mrs Winterson. It was a cover story, a painful past written over and repainted. It was a story of survival.

This book is that story’s the silent twin. It is full of hurt and humour and a fierce love of life. It is about the pursuit of happiness, about lessons in love, the search for a mother and a journey into madness and out again. It is generous, honest and true.

Reviewed by Perspectives

An honest, raw, human book, Beautifully written. This provided a lot of discussion about adoption and the other issues raised

Star rating: ****

The Bellwether Revivals by Benjamin Wood

About the book

Bright, bookish Oscar Lowe has grown to love the quiet routine of his life as a care assistant at a Cambridge nursing home, until the fateful day when he is lured into King’s College chapel by the otherworldly sound of an organ. There he meets and falls in love with Iris Bellwether and her privileged, eccentric clique, led by her brother Eden. A troubled but charismatic music prodigy, Eden convinces his sister and their friends to participate in a series of disturbing experiments. However, as the line between genius and madness begins to blur, Oscar fears that danger could await them all …

 

Reviewed by In Sync

A few liked the book and found it interesting; others found it to be rather challenging and not so enjoyable. There was a lot of psychology in it, and some of us were annoyed that the end was at the beginning.

Star rating: None provided

 

 

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

About the book

Clarissa Dalloway is a woman of high-society – vivacious, hospitable and sociable on the surface, yet underneath troubled and dissatisfied with her life in post-war Britain. This disillusionment is an emotion that bubbles under the surface of all of Woolf’s characters in Mrs Dalloway.

Centred around one day in June where Clarissa is preparing for and holding a party, her interior monologue mingles with those of the other central characters in a stream of consciousness, entwining, yet never actually overriding the pervading sense of isolation that haunts each person.

One of Virginia Woolf’s most accomplished novels, Mrs Dalloway is widely regarded as one of the most revolutionary works of the 20th century in its style and the themes that it tackles. The sense that Clarissa has married the wrong person, her past love for another female friend and the death of an intended party guest all serve to amplify this stultifying existence.

Reviewed by Sheet WI

Provoked thoughts and discussion but not easy to read. Very evocative descriptions but depiction of characters’ physical attributes not so good

star rating ***

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East Lynne by Ellen Wood

About the book

Coward! Sneak! May good men shun him, from henceforth! may his Queen refuse to receive him! You, an earl’s daughter! Oh, Isabel! How utterly you have lost yourself!’ When the aristocratic Lady Isabel abandons her husband and children for her wicked seducer, more is at stake than moral retribution. Ellen Wood played upon the anxieties of the Victorian middle classes who feared a breakdown of the social order as divorce became more readily available and promiscuity threatened the sanctity of the family. In her novel the simple act of hiring a governess raises the spectres of murder, disguise, and adultery. Her sensation novel was devoured by readers from the Prince of Wales to Joseph Conrad and continued to fascinate theatre-goers and cinema audiences well into the next century.

Reviewed by The Benches

Although this 19 Century novel was more than 600 pages, the consensus was that it was an ‘easy’ read, well strung together with strongly developed characters – The Judge: A pompous fellow – Cornelia: A sharply spoken Harridan: Barbara: only happy when she had her own way: and Isobel: a rather feeble heroine. An obvious plot, probably originated as a weekly journal and conveniently some of the story was repetitive. A victorian’soap’ Appealing more, perhaps to women readers.”

star rating ***

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The Ginger Tree by Oswald Wynd

About the book

In 1903, a young Scotswoman named Mary Mackenzie sets sail for China to marry her betrothed, a military attache in Peking. But soon after her arrival, Mary falls into an adulterous affair with a young Japanese nobleman, scandalizing the British community. Casting her out of the European community, her compatriots tear her away from her small daughter. A woman abandoned and alone, Mary learns to survive over forty tumultuous years in Asia, including two world wars and the cataclysmic Tokyo earthquake of 1923.

 

Reviewed by EMS Valley U3A

A fascinating story written in chronological order for a change! A story of a woman’s journey from innocent young girl to strong business woman. We were all amazed that it was written by a man. Some of the interesting insights and descriptions of Chinese / Japanese culture and to women’s feelings and fashions we felt were very feminine. A very good read.”

star rating ****

 

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Spilling the Beans by Clarissa Dixon Wright

About the book

Clarissa was born into wealth and privilege, as a child, shooting and hunting were the norm and pigeons were flown in from Cairo for supper. Her mother was an Australian heiress, her father was a brilliant surgeon to the Royal family. But he was also a tyrannical and violent drunk who used to beat her and force her to eat carrots with slugs still clinging to them. Clarissa was determined and clever, though, and her ambition led her to a career in the law. At the age of 21, she was the youngest ever woman to be called to the Bar. Disaster struck when her adored mother died suddenly. It was to lead to a mind-numbing decade of wild over-indulgence. Rich from her inheritance, in the end Clarissa partied away her entire fortune. It was a long, hard road to recovery along which Clarissa finally faced her demons and turned to the one thing that had always brought her joy – cooking. Now at last she has found success, sobriety and peace. With the stark honesty and the brilliant wit we love her for, Clarissa recounts the tale of a life lived to extremes. A vivid and funny story, it is as moving as it is a cracking good read.

 

Reviewed by Sway Library Society

A very interesting biography – an honest account of alcoholism and an amazing life. Enjoyable”

star rating ****

 

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Shadows of the Workhouse by Jennifer Worth

About the book

In this follow up to CALL THE MIDWIFE, Jennifer Worth, a midwife working in the docklands area of East London in the 1950s tells more stories about the people she encountered.

There’s Jane, who cleaned and generally helped out at Nonnatus House – she was taken to the workhouse as a baby and was allegedly the illegitimate daughter of an aristocrat. Peggy and Frank’s parents both died within 6 months of each other and the children were left destitute. At the time, there was no other option for them but the workhouse.

The Reverend Thornton-Appleby-Thorton, a missionary in Africa, visits the Nonnatus nuns and Sister Julienne acts as matchmaker. And Sister Monica Joan, the eccentric ninety-year-old nun, is accused of shoplifting some small items from the local market. She is let off with a warning, but then Jennifer finds stolen jewels from Hatton Garden in the nun’s room. These stories give a fascinating insight into the resilience and spirit that enabled ordinary people to overcome their difficulties.

Reviewed by Andover HIP

Story flows well. Everyone enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone

star rating ****

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Call the Midwife by Jennifer Worth

About the book

Jennifer Worth came from a sheltered background when she became a midwife in the Docklands in the 1950s. The conditions in which many women gave birth just half a century ago were horrifying, not only because of their grimly impoverished surroundings, but also because of what they were expected to endure. But while Jennifer witnessed brutality and tragedy, she also met with amazing kindness and understanding, tempered by a great deal of Cockney humour. She also earned the confidences of some whose lives were truly stranger, more poignant and more terrifying than could ever be recounted in fiction.

Attached to an order of nuns who had been working in the slums since the 1870s, Jennifer tells the story not only of the women she treated, but also of the community of nuns (including one who was accused of stealing jewels from Hatton Garden) and the camaraderie of the midwives with whom she trained. Funny, disturbing and incredibly moving, Jennifer’s stories bring to life the colourful world of the East End in the 1950s.

Reviewed by Andover Library

The majority loved the social history of the book, The medical information was a bit too much and maybe not necessary – especially the glossary. Much discussion about the changes between then and now with the NHS”

star rating ***

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Lottery by Patricia Wood

About the book

Perry L. Crandall knows what it’s like to be an outsider. With an IQ of 76, he’s an easy mark. Before his grandmother died, she armed Perry well with what he’d need to know: the importance of words and writing things down, and how to play the lottery. Most importantly, she taught him whom to trust – a crucial lesson for Perry when he wins the multimillion-dollar jackpot. As his family descends, moving in on his fortune, his fate and his few true friends, he has a lesson for them: never ever underestimate Perry L. Crandall.

 

Reviewed by Stubbington Book Ends

A delightful book. Enjoyed by everyone. Some lovely characters and some awful ones. A well crafted book which explored the true value of life”

star rating ***

 

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The Godless Boys by Naomi Wood

About the book

Imagine an alternative England, where the Church controls the country and non-believers have been exiled to a remote island.

On the Island, a fierce group of boys patrols the community, searching for signs of faith and punishing any believers. When a new girl appears, arriving from the mainland to search for her long-lost mother, the gang is split: one boy falls in love with her, another seeks violent revenge. The struggle between them will change everything.

 

Reviewed by Rucstall Mums

We didn’t like the style it was written in – the description of the book didn’t match our experience. The majority didn’t complete it L

star rating **

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