In Siberia by Colin Thubron

This is the account of Thubron's 15,000-mile journey through an astonishing country - one twelfth of the land surface of the whole earth. He journeyed by train, river and truck among the people most damaged by the breakup of the Soviet Union, traveling among Buddhists and animists, radical Christian sects, reactionary Communists and the remnants of a so-call Jewish state; from the site of the last Czar's murder and Rasputin's village, to the ice-bound graves of ancient Sythians, to Baikal, deepest and oldest of the world's lakes. It is the story of a people moving through the ruins of Communism into more private, diverse and often stranger worlds.

The Immortal life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

About the book Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer whose cancer cells became one of the most important tools in medicine. Rebecca Skloot takes the reader on an extraordinary journey in search of Henrietta's story. Reviewed by Bookends We found this book to… Continue reading The Immortal life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

12 years a slave by Solomon Northup

About the book Born a free man in New York State in 1808, Solomon Northup was kidnapped in Washington, D.C., in 1841. He spent the next 12 years as a slave on a Louisiana cotton plantation, and during this time he was frequently abused and often afraid for his life. This is his detailed description… Continue reading 12 years a slave by Solomon Northup

The Time traveller's guide to Medieval England by Ian Mortimer

About the book Imagine you could get into a time machine and travel back to the 14th century. This text sets out to explain what life was like in the most immediate way, through taking the reader to the Middle Ages, and showing everything from the horrors of leprosy and war to the ridiculous excesses… Continue reading The Time traveller's guide to Medieval England by Ian Mortimer

The Storyteller's daughter by Saira Shah

About the book Saira¬†always felt like an outsider. As a child growing up in Britain, she was told that she came from a far away Eastern land, a magical place that her father, the storyteller, would bring exotically to life. When, at the age of twenty-one, Saira set out to discover this magic land for… Continue reading The Storyteller's daughter by Saira Shah

Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee

About the book This is a vivid memoir of childhood in a remote Cotswold village, a village before electricity or cars, a timeless place on the verge of change. Growing up amongst the fields and woods and characters of the place, Laurie Lee depicts a world that is both immediate and real and belonging to… Continue reading Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee

Toast by Nigel Slater

About the book This is Nigel Slater's truly extraordinary story of his childhood remembered through food. Nigel's likes and dislikes, aversions and sweet-toothed weaknesses form a fascinating and often amusing backdrop to this incredibly moving and evocative memoir of childhood, adolescence and sexual awakening. Reviewed by Eastleigh Library Wed Afternoon Mixed reviews within the group.… Continue reading Toast by Nigel Slater

A Daughter's tale by Mary Soames

About the book Born in 1922, Mary Soames is the only surviving child of Winston and Clementine Churchill. Her memoir draws us into the almost surreal world where the ordinary details of family life proceed against a background of cataclysmic events. Reviewed by CC Readers This book was enjoyed by all the group. Everyone was… Continue reading A Daughter's tale by Mary Soames

The Bookseller of Kabul by Asne Seierstad

About the book In the spring of 2002, journalist Asne Seierstad went to Afghanistan to live with a family for several months. Here she reveals her experiences, telling the story of Sultan Khan - who defied the authorities for 20 years to supply books to the people of Kabul - and his family. Reviewed by… Continue reading The Bookseller of Kabul by Asne Seierstad